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10 Differences Between Moonshining and Homebrewing


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Moonshiners Make Money
Samples of Junior Johnson's strawberry-flavored moonshine were handed out at NASCAR Hall of Fame Weekend in 2012. © Leon T. Switzer/ Icon SMI/Corbis
Samples of Junior Johnson's strawberry-flavored moonshine were handed out at NASCAR Hall of Fame Weekend in 2012. © Leon T. Switzer/ Icon SMI/Corbis

Moonshiners typically control their product from still to store, with the "store" being anyone who will secretly buy their spirits – unless they have the necessary federal and state permits, of course.

And, moonshiners can make bank. They can haul in more than $100,000 a year in a legal operation [source: Harvison]. And probably make even more when it's an illegal operation. One moonshine bust in Tennessee netted 1,000 jugs of moonshine thought to have a street value of $50,000 [source: Young].

Of course, you could try to make some money by selling homebrew -- even though it is illegal to sell it, too [source: Homebrewers Association]. But good luck finding buyers who will empty their pockets for your beer. And selling homemade wine? Well, you may have to pay your friends to drink it.


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