Innovation

Do you know how common everyday items, such as mirrors, fireworks or sunglasses work? This collection of Innovation articles explores the workings of objects you may come into contact with on a regular basis.


There's a candy called 'Pop Rocks.' When you put it in your mouth it makes a loud popping sound and it feels really weird! How do Pop Rocks work?

It certainly doesn’t bubble up at the drugstore, and it’s kind of a snooze if you pour it on skin that doesn’t have a cut on it. So, what is it about blood that makes hydrogen peroxide start foaming at the mouth?

Yesterday you talked about hydrogen peroxide, and the day before you talked about Pop Rocks candy. Since we are talking about things that fizz, what about Alka Seltzer? How does it work and why does it fizz?

Most doctors use a variety of instruments to assess your health. Ever wondered just what they all do?

Kidney dialysis allows severely ill patients to urinate through a medical device. Find out how dialysis works.

X-ray machines are an indispensable part of medical diagnosis. Find out how they see right through you.

Many of the things I buy contain little packets of crystals. Some of them actually say "Silica Gel" on them, but many are unlabeled or say something like, "Do not eat." I have found these packets in electronics, vitamins and even in some pepperoni I

How do chickens create eggs? Does the chicken's body make the shell and fill it with the white and yolk somehow, or does it make the white and yolk and then somehow wrap the shell around it?

I have heard that grilling or broiling meat can cause it to become cancerous. Is this true? Find out the answer to this question here.

I saw your question on fog machines and dry ice and would like to know more -- how exactly does dry ice work?

How do scratch-and-sniff stickers work? What makes them last for years and years?

Ear thermometers can get a quick and accurate reading. Learn how they assess your body temperature from inside your ear.

I'm having T-shirts printed, and the people at the shop keep talking about "silk-screening." How does silk-screening work?

A nautical mile is used for navigation at sea. It is a unit of measurement that is based on the circumference of the Earth. How does it relate to a standard mile and a kilometer? Find out in this article.

Crunchy crust, soft, spongy middle -- there's something about fresh-baked bread. Have you ever thought about bread as a technology? Learn about the biochemical reactions that make bread taste so good!

If you're a devotee of this ancient cocoa-bean confection, you may be drooling all over your screen right now. How did seeds from a weird little tree snare the hearts (and taste buds) of the world?

Tired of hearing about things like monounsaturated fats, partially hydrogenated oils and trans fatty acids and not knowing a thing about any of them? Find out what you need to know here.

Because sustenance ensures our survival, food preservation is one of the oldest technologies developed by human beings. Find out what's being done to your food to make it last longer.

Ever wonder what, exactly, you are putting in your body when you eat? Would you like to know the real difference between a "fat" and a "carb"? Learn all about food and how your body uses it!

Got a few grays? Just want a new look? Well, if you are like 75 percent of women, you're part of a billion dollar industry. Learn all about hair coloring and choosing the best color for you.

Want to keep your dog out of the neighbor's yard but feeling guilty pulling out a leash? You might consider an underground or wireless pet fence. Learn how these fascinating systems work and why this specialized fencing industry is booming.