Ambidexterity and Manipulation

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Ambidexterity and Manipulation

Researchers found that ambidextrous subjects were much more prone to emotional manipulation than their right-handed peers.

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Only 5 percent of humans are ambidextrous -- that is, able to use both hands equally well to perform everyday activities [source: Jabr]. Being both-handed is a nice skill to have, whether it's on a baseball diamond or working at one of those German beer halls where the staff is required to carry no less than 17 mugs at a time. But according to a study out of Montclair State University in New Jersey, the gift of ambidexterity may also come with a significant weakness.

By playing classical music and asking subjects to think happy, sad or nervous thoughts, a researcher found that ambidextrous subjects were much more prone to emotional manipulation than their right-handed peers. People in the former group were more likely to shift emotions on command, while right-handers were less malleable. It's believed that the correlation stems from how brains are organized. Ambidextrous people have larger corpus callosums – the structure that links the two halves of the brain. The increased communication between the two hemispheres apparently means both greater flexibility of the hands and greater suggestibility of the emotions [source: Jabr].

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