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4
The New England Blizzard of 1978

This dreadful storm stalled over New England for more than a day, dropping up to 4 inches (10.2 cm) of snow per hour. Boston, Mass. and several communities in Rhode Island were hit hardest, but even New York City -- located some four hours south of Boston -- felt the storm's effects. Meteorologists estimate snow totals between 1 and 3 feet (30.5 and 91.4 cm), with Boston's total accumulation of 27.1 inches (68.8 cm) setting the city's single-storm record [source: NOAA]. Wind speeds measured well over 100 mph (161 kph), causing severe visibility and drifting problems.

This storm was worse than most for two additional reasons. First, it struck during a period of high tides, which led to some of the most severe coastal flooding that region had ever seen. Second, it struck in the afternoon. Since the morning had been clear, most people had gone to school and work as usual. The timing of the storm left thousands of people stranded in their cars on roads and highways throughout the area [source: Hurricanes-blizzards-noreasters.com]. This contributed to the storm's high death rate; more than 100 people died in Massachusetts and Rhode Island [source: NOAA].

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