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10 Incredible Dragons We'd Like to Meet (or Run From)


9
Jabberwock
"The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame, came whiffling through the tulgey wood, and burbled as it came!"
"The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame, came whiffling through the tulgey wood, and burbled as it came!"
John Tenniel/Wikimedia Commons

Writer Lewis Carroll was known as much for his invented language as for his prose. Perhaps the first person to really rock a mash-up, Carroll had a penchant for combining words to give them another meaning (or two).

Using this technique, Carroll conjured images of a great dragon in a poem published in 1871 in his book "Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There." He dubbed it a Jabberwock and gave it a ravenous bite, fiery eyes and sharp claws. The book's original illustrator, Sir John Tenniel (the first illustrator to be knighted for his life's work in the United Kingdom) added giant bat wings for a full dragonlike effect. The poem ends with a triumphant boy lugging the dragon's head back to civilization -- a common literary ending for many dragons [source: Lewis Carroll Society of North America].


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