Science | Space | The Solar System

In the Solar System Channel, you can explore the planets and celestial objects around our own sun. Learn about topics such as Mars, Jupiter and the Moon.

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The Solar System Explained

Our planet Earth is part of a solar system that consists of nine (and possibly ten) planets orbiting a giant, fiery star we call the sun. For thousands of years, astronomers studying the solar system have noticed that these planets march across the sky in a predictable way.


Venus Explained

Venus Explained

Venus is the second planet from the sun, and is about the same size as Earth. Learn more about Venus here. See more »

Saturn Explained

Saturn is the sixth planet from the sun and the second largest planet in the solar system. Learn more about Saturn here. See more »

Earth Explained

Earth is the third planet from the sun, and the fifth largest. Learn more about our home planet here. See more »

Mars Explained

Mars Explained

Mars, which is the fourth planet from the sun and the third smallest in size, got its name because of its rusty red color. Read more here. See more »

How Mars Works

How Mars Works

NASA's rover Spirit landed successfully on Mars over the weekend and sent a message to Earth, confirming a signal lock that allows the transfer of incredible data. Learn all about the Red Planet. See more »

How the Sun Works

How the Sun Works

The sun warms our planet every day, provides the light by which we see and is necessary for life on Earth. Learn about the sun. See more »

Why does the moon look so much bigger when it is near the horizon?

Why does the moon look so much bigger when it is near the horizon than when it is high up in the sky? See more »

How big does a meteor have to be to make it to the ground?

How big does a meteor have to be to make it to the ground?

How big is a shooting star? Do they land on earth or do they burn up? Learn how what tiny particles of space dust have to do with meteors. See more »

What is the Chandler wobble?

What is the Chandler wobble? See more »

Could I see a flashlight beam from Earth on the moon?

If I was on the moon and the earth was black (no lights were on) and a flashlight was turned on facing the moon, would I see the light? If I couldn't, would there be any way to detect any residual matter that came from the light on Earth or does light die after a certain distance? See more »