The Gross, the Guest Suite, and the Grumpy: Our Best Stories You Might Have Missed This Week


Even though it's awkward to sneeze in public, it's better to let it out than stifle it. Trevor Williams/Getty Images

One of the best things to do when you're snowed in is indulge in comfort food. The cooks at HowStuffWorks are serving up fresh knowledge to keep you warm. Here are some of the stories you may have missed this week.

The Gross

There's nothing more annoying than that tingly, itchy feeling in your nose right before you sneeze. In those final moments before the inevitable, many people think they can stifle it. HowStuffWorks has already reported that holding back a sneeze can be lethal, but as if that weren't enough to discourage you from doing it,doctors have provided yet another reason to never hold in a sneeze. In December, a 34-year-old man was hospitalized after suppressing a sneeze. He complained about painful swallowing and crepitus, medical jargon for popping noises under the skin or in the joints. Doctors discovered that his crepitus had extended from his neck to his ribcage, and it resulted in spontaneous pharyngeal rupture. To learn the man's fate, click the link to the article.

The Guest Suite

Many people assume that hanging a "Do Not Disturb" sign on your hotel door guarantees privacy, but after the mass shooting in Las Vegas, hotel owners are revamping the signage. Disney even announced that its hotels in Florida would replace those signs with ones that read "Room Occupied." But, does checking in mean you check your privacy at the door? The amount of privacy you receive at a hotel depends on where you are on the property, and owners are responsible for ensuring the safety of their employees. You can find out how much privacy to expect when you visit a hotel or motel by reading the article.

The Grumpy

Almost everyone has scrolled through the comment section and seen an online argument or engaged in one themselves. The sure-fire way to be labeled a troll is to start writing in all caps. To the unsuspecting commenter, a slew of capitalized letters is a verbal assault, but when did all-caps type become yelling? This week on the Ridiculous History podcast, Ben and Noel delve into the origin of this question, and it goes back farther than internet message groups of the '90s.

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