The Spooky, the Scorching and the Subversive: Our Best Stories You Might Have Missed This Week


A wax figure of 'Frankenstein' sits on display at Dreamland Wax Museum in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on March 11, 2017. Fabio Teixeria/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

With non-stop news cycles and constant mobile notifications, it's easy to succumb to information overload. That's why the writers at HowStuffWorks keep things simple. Here are some of the stories you may have missed this week.

The Spooky

Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein" was way ahead of its time because it explored ethical dilemmas that the scientific and medical communities still face today. The central question the story poses is, "Should an experiment be done just because it can?" Shelley's masterpiece was published in 1818, and in a world where we have the atomic bomb, this a question still being debated. Two Hundred Years On, How Close Is a 'Frankenstein' Future? Well, researchers have successfully made mini-brains, kidneys and other organs in the lab. Soon, they may be able to connect these organs so that they can work together as a system.

The Scorching

Will the Winter Olympics soon be a thing of the past? Many scientists are trying to figure out How Global Warming Is Affecting the Winter Olympics. Daniel Scott and his team of researchers paired historical data with climate projections, and they concluded that nine of the previous locations for the Winter Games may not be cold enough to host them again. Scott's research was originally published in 2014, but it has since been updated to include this year's Winter Games in Pyeongchang, South Korea and the next one in Beijing, China. A warmer climate will also affect athletes' ability to train. By 2050, ski and snowboard seasons may be cut as much as 50 percent and by 2090, 80 percent.

The Subversive

This week on a very special episode of the podcast Stuff Mom Never Told You, former hosts Cristen and Caroline join Bridget and Emilie to discuss What it means to be 'Unladylike' in 2018. On their new podcast Unladylike, Cristen and Caroline interview women who refuse to conform to the expectations society places on them. Their aim for the show is to allow other women, especially women of color and self-identified women, to share their experiences. To learn more about Unladylike and what Cristen and Caroline plan to do with their show, click the link above.


More to Explore