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How the FSF-1 Sea Fighter Works

        Science | Navy

The Sports Car of the Seas
Sea Fighter under construction at Nichols Bros. Boat Builders in Washington state
Sea Fighter under construction at Nichols Bros. Boat Builders in Washington state
Photo courtesy U.S. Navy

Compared to larger, conventional warships, the Sea Fighter is faster and more agile. Some have compared its performance to that of sports car. The Sea Fighter can reach a top speed of 50 knots (57.5 mph, 92.6 kph) with a full payload and is designed to reach speeds of 40 knots (46 mph, 74 km/hr) in rough seas with waves up to 7 feet (2.13 meters).

The Sea Fighter has four Rolls Royce Kamewa 125 SII waterjets, which deliver a combined 50.4 megawatts of power and offer great maneuverability. The independent waterjets make sideways movement possible, simplifying operations and berthing.

Waterjet tunnel under construction
Waterjet tunnel under construction
Photo courtesy U.S. Navy
Housing for two of the four waterjets under construction
Housing for two of the four waterjets under construction
Photo courtesy U.S. Navy

The waterjets are powered by two GE LM2500 gas turbine engines and two MTU 16-valve propulsion diesel engines.


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