Like HowStuffWorks on Facebook!

How the HondaJet Works

        Science | Modern

Design and Specifications
Takeo Fukui, President and Representative Director of Honda Motor Co., Ltd. stands next to a model of HondaJet at a media conference on Dec. 17, 2003 in Tokyo, Japan.
Takeo Fukui, President and Representative Director of Honda Motor Co., Ltd. stands next to a model of HondaJet at a media conference on Dec. 17, 2003 in Tokyo, Japan.
Koichi Kamoshida/Getty Images

In building a new kind of business jet, Honda has implemented designs and technologies that set it apart from other jets. One of the ways the company has done this is through the natural-laminar flow (NLF) design that increases the aerodynamics of a plane. Think of NLF as the length of airflow over a wing's surface. The more length of airflow that a wing has, without interruption from wing materials or construction, the less interference the NLF has and the more aerodynamic a wing can be. The more interference a wing has from materials or design construction the more wavy or rough the surface will be, resulting in a reduction of aerodynamics.

The HondaJet's NLF wing design decreases air drag and is constructed with a minimal amount of parts, which Honda says will reduce manufacturing procedures.

Another integral part of the HondaJet's design is its all-composite fuselage. While Honda isn't the first to use an all-composite fuselage (the famed Boeing Dreamliner has one as well), the design will reduce manufacturing processes and maximize the fuel efficiency of the HondaJet.

The construction of the composite fuselage also allows for more interior space of the cabin. The HondaJet can transport up to five passengers and two crewmembers in the cabin, and also includes 66 cubic feet of space for luggage. Some of the perks in the cabin include fully adjustable leather seats, power window shades, a private bathroom with a black marble sink and even a drop-down aisle that allows passengers to move more easily within the cabin.

The HondaJet has a range of about 1,400 nautical miles. A nautical mile (nm) is about 1.15 surface miles; New York to Los Angeles is just over 2,100 nm [source: Stratos Jets]. Honda's over-the-wing engines propel the plane up to 489 miles per hour, or about 420 KTAS, which stands for knots true airspeed [source: Honda].

Next, find out what it takes to get the HondaJet off the ground -- Honda's over-the-wing engines.


More to Explore