Astronomers

Astronomers have contributed greatly to our understanding of physics and motion. In this section you can learn all about famous astronomers and what each of them has contributed to our understanding of space.

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He starred with Superman, drove the getaway car at Pluto's demise and was voted sexiest astrophysicist by People magazine. Is there anything Neil deGrasse Tyson can't do?

By Laurie L. Dove

Nostradamus, the Latin name of Michel de Notredame (1503-1566), a French astrologer and physician.

Flammarion, (Nicolas) Camille (1842-1925), a French astronomer. He was the author of many popular books on astronomy, including The Atmosphere (1871), Popular Astronomy (1879), and Astronomy for Amateurs (1904).

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Cannon, Annie Jump (1863-1941), a United States astronomer. She had a long, distinguished career at Harvard Observatory, 18961940, and was one of the foremost women scientists of her time.

Hewish, Antony (1924-) is a British astronomer and astrophysicist, a scientist who studies the physical nature, origin, and development of the solar system, galaxies, and the universe.

Eddington, Sir Arthur Stanley (1882--1944), a British astronomer. As chief assistant at the Royal Greenwich Observatory, 1906--13, he began his studies of the motion, internal structure, and evolution of stars.

Shoemaker, Carolyn (1929-) is an American astronomer. She has discovered more comets than any other living astronomer.

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Payne-Gaposchkin, Cecilia Helena (1900-1979) was a British-born astronomer who became an authority on variable stars (stars that change in brightness) and the structure of the Milky Way Galaxy.

Young, Charles Augustus (1834-1908) was a United States astronomer noted for his spectroscopic studies of the sun.

Mason, Charles (1730-1787), an English astronomer and surveyor. In addition to surveying the boundary between Maryland and Pennsylvania, Jeremiah Dixon and he fixed the precise measure of a degree of latitude in America.

Messier, Charles (1730-1817), a French astronomer, discovered or independently codiscovered some 20 comets, earning him the nickname the “ferret of comets” by King Louis XV.

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Rittenhouse, David (1732-1796) was a United States astronomer and mathematician. Next to Benjamin Franklin, he was the most respected American man of science of his time.

Halley, Edmund (1656-1743), was an English astronomer and scientist. He is best known for his studies of the comet that bears his name.

Hubble, Edwin P. (Powell) (18891953), a United States astronomer. Hubble revolutionized astronomy by showing that the universe is much larger than had been previously believed and by providing observational evidence for the theory of an expanding universe.

Eudoxus of Cnidus (NY duhs or kuh NY duhs) (400 B.C.?-350 B.C.?) was a Greek astronomer who made important contributions to the field of geometry.

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Hoyle, Sir Fred (1915-2001), a British astronomer, noted for research on the development of stars.

Argelander, Friedrich Wilhelm August (1799-1875) was a Finnish-German astronomer and professor of astronomy who compiled the Banner Durchmusterung, a catalog which recorded the positions and magnitudes of 324,198 stars of the northern celestial hemisphere.

Bessel, Friedrich Wilhelm (1784-1846), a German astronomer, was the first to measure stellar parallax, an apparent change in a star's position as a result of the earth orbiting the sun.

Schiaparelli, Giovanni Virginia (1835-1910), was an Italian astronomer. He is best known for his studies of Mars, begun in 1877, in which he described in detail the Martian canals.

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Bradley, James (1693-1762), an English astronomer, discovered the aberration of starlight that provided the first direct proof that the earth revolves around the sun, and the nutation, or nodding motion, of the earth's axis.

Bell Burnell, Jocelyn (1943-), a Northern Irish astronomer, discovered the first four pulsars, neutron stars that emit pulses of radiation with a high degree of regularity.

Adams, John Couch (1819-1892), was a British astronomer and one of the discoverers of the planet Neptune.

Flamsteed, John (16461719), an English astronomer. Flamsteed was appointed the first astronomer royal, in 1675, and Greenwich Observatory was built for him in 1676.

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Tsiolkovsky (or Ziolkovsky), Konstantin Eduardovich (1857-1935), a Russian rocket pioneer who is generally regarded as the father of space travel.

Al-Tusi, Nasir al-Din (1201-1274) was one of the greatest scholars of his time and one of the most influential figures in Islamic intellectual history.