Inside the Mind

What are dreams really made of? Are humans the smartest animal? What causes schizophrenia? Travel inside the mind and find out how the human brain works.

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Brain mapping is an ongoing effort to provide a complete picture of the brain's structure. It's a massive project, but scientists could use it to diagnose and treat diseases, test psychotropic drugs and even figure out where sarcasm comes from.

By Susan L. Nasr

We all experience grief at one time or another after we lose someone important to us. But did you know there are many different types of grief?

By Alia Hoyt

Everyone cries. For some it's an emotional response, while others just shed tears when chopping onions. Are tears a way for us to cleanse our bodies?

By Alia Hoyt

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We've all seen the effects that hatred has on our society, but just what is this destructive emotion? And can it be overcome?

By Alia Hoyt

You've probably heard some perfect couple smugly say, "Oh, we never fight." Besides being annoying, could their lack of fighting be unhealthy?

By Molly Edmonds

We've all felt fury wash over us. Whether it's the guy who blurts the score to the game you TiVo'ed or the woman who lets the door slam in your face, anger is universal. You might as well learn how it works.

By Molly Edmonds

Everyone's familiar with the green-eyed monster called jealousy. But why do people have those feelings, and why are they associated with the color green?

By Alia Hoyt

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If you could control your dreams, what would you do? Grow wings and fly, travel to ancient Rome, dine with Marilyn Monroe, open opera season at the Met? It could be possible.

By Katie Lambert

In the past, applying electricity to the brain was a painful measure of last resort. Now with lower power and electrodes surgically planted deep within the brain, it could be the answer to many debilitating diseases.

By Isaac Perry Clements

You may vaguely remember hurting your knee at the age of 3, but do you recall the moment your body burst into the world? Most likely not. Why are our first years devoid of memories?

By Cristen Conger

Can you be bored to death? Sometimes it feels that way but has someone ever really died of boredom? You might be surprised at the ways boredom can shorten your life.

By Cristen Conger

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Can your mirror lie? Though loved ones reassure you that your appearance is normal, all you see is your flawed, monstrous reflection. This is life with body dysmorphic disorder.

By Jessika Toothman

In the wild, are brains better than brawn? Find out when your fight-or-flight response is your friend and when it's your enemy.

By Cristen Conger

People with schizophrenia can experience delusions, hallucinations and paranoia. But they don't have to suffer social isolation. Find out what successful treatments can help people with the disorder.

By Jane McGrath

Memory is your only personal record of the past and of who you are as an individual. What if you woke up one morning and your memory was gone?

By Cristen Conger

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One of the top-prescribed sleeping pills may cause you to shuffle out of bed and sleepwalk to the fridge. Could Ambien be making you sleepy and hungry?

By Cristen Conger

Imagine feeling like you were born into the wrong body. People with gender identity disorder (GID) suffer persistent dissatisfaction with their gender identity. But is it fair to call GID a psychological disorder?

By Maria Trimarchi

According to UFO psychology research, many of those who report seeing UFOs may have psychological disorders. UFOs come to represent important symbols in their lives. Learn more about UFO psychology.

By the Editors of Publications International, Ltd.

Sleepwalking is an intriguing phenomenon. How can a person be unconscious but still coordinate his or her limbs? And how do we know when we're really awake?

By Katie Lambert

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Blushing comes from the same system that causes your fight-or-flight response. But why do your cheeks flush? Is it some kind of universal, wordless apology?

By Josh Clark

You get home from a long day, and all you want to do is see your family. But when you walk in the door, your family isn't your family. They've been replaced by imposters -- or you have capgras syndrome.

By Katie Lambert

That man dressed in animal skins and running around Jerusalem trying to baptize people isn't alone. Tourists in Jerusalem sometimes suffer from a strange conviction that they are Biblical figures. Are they mentally ill or is there more to it?

By Katie Lambert

You've just touched a hot stove -- and probably felt an immediate sharp pain, then a dull ache. How do we sense pain, and why does it eventually go away?

By Craig Freudenrich, Ph.D.

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When you see someone else yawn, you often find yourself doing it. Yawning is contagious. But what does that have to do with the ability to feel empathy?

By Josh Clark

You might think that not being able to feel pain would be a blessing. No tears, no painkillers, no lingering aches. But really, not being able to feel pain is dangerous.

By Katie Lambert