Life Science

From the smallest microbe to the largest mammal, Life Science explores the origins, evolution and expansion of life in all its forms. Explore a wide range of topics from biology to genetics and evolution.

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The Mystery, Myth and Reality of Plum Island

For years, speculation has surrounded the government's high security animal disease research center, which is slated to close in 2023.

Science Is Finding Out Why Some Love ASMR Videos and Others Hate Them

ASMR has become a pop phenomenon and scientists are trying to figure out why some people love those tingling-inducing videos and others can't stand them.

This Science Experiment Will Run for 500 Years

Scientists started an experiment back in 2014 that will run for 500 years. The first results were recently published. So, what have they found so far?

The Magical Medicine of Bezoars

Bezoars are concretions found in the stomachs of animals that were once believed to cure poisoning and plague.

How a Booming Legal Marijuana Industry Could Harm Air Quality

In a high-traffic city like Denver, a booming cannabis industry could make air quality even worse.

Try These 5 Daily Habits to Improve Your Life This Year

A new year is always a good time to set new goals. We've come up with five healthy changes that have been scientifically shown to improve your well-being.

A 'Tree That Owns Itself' Grows in Athens, Georgia

A massive white oak in the hometown of the University of Georgia has many wondering whether a tree can even have legal rights — and about the future of the environmental and animal rights movements.

The Science Behind Your Cat's Catnip Craze

Researchers are studying the chemistry behind what makes cats go crazy for catnip. And whether or not the chemical compound could have medicinal benefits for treating diseases like cancer.

Tons of Life Found Deep Within Earth's Surface

Could these incredible new organisms provide clues about how life might exist in other areas on Earth — or even on other planets?

Scientists Call for a Global Germ Bank

Researchers are calling for a new "Noah's Ark" to store microbes that might one day be valuable.

Yes, Neanderthals Could Laugh

The more we research our closest extinct human ancestor, the more we realize how similar we were. But could we have shared a joke?

How Close Are We to Growing a Square Tomato?

Scientists have discovered the two gene families that play key roles in making fruits and vegetables either round or long. So, could a square fruit be on the horizon?

How Dopamine Works

You could call dopamine the most misunderstood neurochemical in the brain. It's allegedly the cause of people getting addicted to drugs, chocolate or video games. But what does really dopamine do?

Mothers Prefer Daughters, Fathers Prefer Sons, Study Says

A new study shows that mothers prefer daughters and fathers prefer sons, regardless of economic background, contradicting an earlier well-known hypothesis.

DNA Evidence Uncovers Two Forgotten North American Migrations

North Americans have been moving south for tens of thousands of years.

Creating Superhumans Through Gene Manipulation and More

Superhuman powers are rare, but some do exist. But what if scientists used gene manipulation to create humans with super strength and abilities in the future — like super soldiers?

Do Plants Make Music?

Machines can translate some of the biological functions of plants into synthesizer sounds. But are these synthesized translations the same thing as music?

Rare Groundcherry Could Soon Be Everywhere, Thanks to Gene Editing

Hundreds of crops in developing countries are relatively unknown in the developed world because they're often hard to grow or export. But scientists have found that CRISPR editing can speed up traditional plant breeding techniques.

Plants Evolve Scents and Colors to Attract Animals for Seed Dispersal

How does a plant — incapable of waving its arms or screaming — attract attention and spread its seed? By evolving a powerful stink or an attractive color, of course.

Interbreeding with Neanderthals Gave Humans Virus Protections

New research suggests modern humans owe some of our genetic resistance against RNA viruses to our Neanderthal ancestors.

Why Can We Hear Others' Footsteps, But Not Our Own?

The noises that others make — be it walking, chewing or breathing heavily — are very noticeable to us. Yet we seldom hear it in ourselves. Why is that?

Unicorn Root Resurrects Itself After 130 Years

Can a plant disappear for more than a century and then come back? Unicorn root, gone for 130 years, reappeared in the summer of 2018, completely out of the blue.

Ancient Egyptian Pregnancy Test Survived Millenia Because It Worked

A strange, but surprisingly accurate, ancient Egyptian pregnancy test survived for millennia and was spread around Africa and Europe because it was just that effective.

Laziness May Have Doomed This Human Ancestor

Homo erectus lived for more than a million years on Earth, but laziness and lack of innovation might have been the death of them.

Did Schizophrenia Evolve Along With Our Brains?

Turns out that evolutionary advantages can come with a price.

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