A forensic expert of the International Commission for Missing Persons works with DNA evidence.
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A forensic expert of the International Commission for Missing Persons works with DNA evidence.

When there is a murder, suspicious fire or hit-and-run accident, police and rescue workers aren't the only ones in on the investigation. Forensic scientists also play an important part. They will take samples collected at the scene and analyze them in a forensics laboratory. With a little ingenuity and some very high-tech equipment, forensic scientists can help law enforcement catch even the wiliest perpetrator.

Forensic science is a discipline that applies scientific analysis to the justice system, often to help prove the events of a crime. Forensic scientists analyze and interpret evidence found at the crime scene. That evidence can include blood, saliva, fibers, tire tracks, drugs, alcohol, paint chips and firearm residue.

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­Using scientific equipment, forensic scientists identify the components of the samples and match them up. For example, they may determine that a paint chip found on a hit-and-run accident victim came off a '96 Ford Mustang convertible, a fib­er found at a murder scene belonged to an Armani jacket or a bullet was fired from a Glock G24 pistol.

 

How do forensic scientists turn even the tiniest clues into real evidence that can help track down criminals? What are the latest technologies being used today in forensics labs? Find out next.

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