Conservation

Conservation is a growing concern in the field of science. As humans continue to consume natural resources, many organisms are headed for extinction.

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A wall spanning a continent would alter the environment for the worse, with its impact felt across numerous species and ecosystems.

By Jesslyn Shields

Now that its sequel is out, where did Al Gore's landmark environmental documentary hit the mark? What did it get wrong?

By Patrick J. Kiger

The OneLessStraw campaign encourages people to kick their straw habit to keep plastic from harming the environment.

By Kate Kershner

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China has a voracious appetite for elephant ivory, but the country plans to shut down its ivory market by the end of 2017. Will it be enough to save the elephants?

By Jesslyn Shields

New findings about ancient, extinct Australasian bandicoot and bilby species underscore how dire things are today when even survivors like these are struggling.

By Jesslyn Shields

A new study shows how, years after the disaster, oil from the disaster has made its way into terrestrial species.

By Jesslyn Shields

Five trillion cigarettes are discarded each year globally. New research looks at the metal content of those on just one beach in the Persian Gulf.

By Karen Kirkpatrick

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The temporary installation joins the four bronze Barbary lion statues in London's Trafalgar Square; it highlights the rapid ongoing decline in worldwide lion population.

By Christopher Hassiotis

Variety isn't just the spice of life; it's the currency of all well-functioning ecosystems great and small. What happens that currency is in trouble?

By John Perritano

With the world's population expanding and its arable land shrinking, how in the world are we going to have enough food to feed everyone? Here are five ways.

By Becky Striepe

About 70 percent of our energy comes from non-renewable sources like oil and natural gas. When they're gone, they're gone for good. Learn some simple ways to conserve energy through these five simple experiments.

By John Kelly

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Today's kids are pretty sophisticated consumers of information and technology, but there's still room for some wonder in their lives. Wow them with these awesome Earth facts.

By Kate Kershner

Recycling is no longer a fad, it's a necessity, and it's never too early to get the whole family involved. Here's how to do it while also having some fun!

By Emilie Sennebogen

As with most lessons, children learn by watching their parents, so it's up to you to teach them how to live a sustainable life.

By Emilie Sennebogen

While water falls from the sky in the form of rain, it may be hard to explain to your kids that clean water actually isn't infinite. We'll show you how to get the message across.

By Sara Elliott

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Celebrated since 1970, Earth Day is a time to honor Mother Earth and pay attention to what we're doing to her. It's also a great day to get your kids involved.

By Sara Elliott

You probably do your best to make sure your children are environmentally responsible, but sometimes the whole family needs a little kick start. Here are five fun ways to teach your kids more about being green.

By Alison Cooper

The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is explained in this article. Learn about the Great Pacific Garbage Patch explained.

By Jaymi Heimbuch

Without its keystone, a Roman aqueduct collapses. Does the same travesty befall an ecosystem when a keystone species goes missing from the ecological equation?

By William Harris

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Insects and biodiversity go hand in hand. Without insects our planet would not survive as they are essential to biodiversity. Check out this gallery on the relationship between insects and biodiversity.

Biodiversity means rainforests and reefs teeming with species right? There's more to it than that though. Genetic diversity has a big role to play, too. Just ask that cheetah cub.

By William Harris

Men have been hunting and killing whales for centuries. Early whalers hunted for survival, but their motivation may have changed once there was money to be made. Whaling for profit has been banned since 1986, but whaling for scientific research is still allowed in certain areas, causing much debate.

By Alison Kim Perry

Flagship species like leopards, whales and wolves grace wildlife calendars, bring in big conservation dollars and help regulate their ecosystems. But what about the tiny guys you won't find on your calendar? How important are they to Earth's biodiversity?

By Jessika Toothman

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Our planet would be a much different place without its richly diverse ecosystems full of plants, animals and microorganisms. What poses the biggest danger to the millions of species that call Earth home?

By Jonathan Atteberry

Since the Age of Discovery, we've been toting plants and animals to parts of the world where they don't belong. While most transplants die, some become invasive. How can these newcomers lead to breakneck-pace evolution?

By Jessika Toothman