Environmental Science

The environment is truly a thing of beauty and should be protected whenever possible. What can we do to save the environment, and what new technology is available to help us?

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According to Guinness World Records, the waves in Nazaré, Portugal, are the biggest ever surfed. Scientists attribute the massive waves to an underwater canyon, but how does it work?

By Dylan Ris

The U.N. Convention on Biological Diversity, or COP15, will begin in Montreal, Dec. 7, 2022. China will lead the conference of 196 nations, setting the agenda and tone, despite a less-than-stellar record on species protection.

By Vanessa Hull

Native Americans have quarried red pipestone from the land that is now Pipestone National Monument for centuries. What makes this particular stone so sacred?

By Jennifer Walker-Journey

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As nations convene in Sharm El-Sheikh, Egypt, for the United Nations Climate Change Conference, climate scientists share insight on how to make policy most effective.

By Meghie Rodrigues

The world's population is expected to hit 8 billion Nov. 15 2022. Is that too many people or just right?

By Melanie Channon & Jasmine Fledderjohann

When it comes to rivers, longest doesn't necessarily mean biggest, and length can be difficult to determine, so the top spot will always be debated.

By Jesslyn Shields

Scientists are concerned that the Thwaites Glacier is melting at a rapid pace, though some don't love the name "Doomsday Glacier." What does the rapid melt of this huge glacier mean for the future of our planet?

By Mark Mancini

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It was the world's largest diamond when mined and today it's cut into nine gems that are all part of the British Crown Jewels. But since the death of Queen Elizabeth II, questions have emerged about its imperialist history.

By Dave Roos

The amount of methane leaked from the Nord Stream pipelines poses a major climate risk. But scientists are still determining just how much damage was done.

By Karen McVeigh & Philip Oltermann

Radiocarbon dating is a cornerstone of climate and archaeological sciences. But it could be threated as fossil fuel emissions negate the useful signal from atomic tests.

By Caroline Hasler

Here are six surprises that were uncovered around the globe when the heat rose and the water receded.

By Cherise Threewitt

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Arizona isn't all desert. Take Grand Falls, aka "Chocolate Falls." It is dry most of the year, but when it rains, this waterfall pours.

By Patty Rasmussen

Split as if by a laser, the Al Naslaa rock in Saudi Arabia's Tayma Oasis baffles scientists and amateur geologists alike. How did this perfect split happen?

By Laurie L. Dove

Rossby waves influence everything from high tides to extreme weather patterns, and not just on Earth. They also occur on the sun and on Venus and Jupiter as well. So, what are they exactly?

By Mark Mancini

An organization called Pull to Refresh hopes to use seaweed to remove and store atmospheric carbon to stave off climate change. Here's how this cool idea works.

By Patrick J. Kiger

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The Poles of Inaccessibility are the locations on Earth that are the farthest away from either water or land and are the most remote spots in the world.

By Patrick J. Kiger

Trovants, found only in a small town in Romania, are stones that actually seem to move and grow. But are they alive?

By Jennifer Walker-Journey

A case currently being decided by the Supreme Court could limit the scope of authority Congress can give to the EPA, including the Clean Air Act. Why does that matter?

By Jennifer Walker-Journey

Plastic Whale, an Amsterdam-based company blends tourism, environmental cleanup and manufacturing in the world's first plastic fishing business. The goal: to make the world's waters plastic-free.

By Jesslyn Shields

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Does searching through the mud of a riverbank for treasures of old sound like a fun way to spend a day? If so, you may just be a true mudlarker at heart.

By Jennifer Walker-Journey

Hydropower is essential to the U.S. power grid, but it only creates energy when there's water to move. How many hydroelectric plants could be in jeopardy as lakes and rivers dry up?

By Caitlin Grady & Lauren Dennis

The element lithium is one of just three created during the Big Bang and has been used for mental health care for decades. But now it's in higher demand than ever before.

By Allison Troutner

Hair trimmings from salons and personal donations can be repurposed as mats that soak up oil spills and help protect the environment.

By Patrick J. Kiger

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A virtual power plant is a network of wind farms, solar parks and home battery systems designed to relieve the energy load on the main power grid. We talked to one expert to find out how.

By Patrick J. Kiger

The U.S. Senate recently passed a bill to make daylight saving time permanent. However, many health groups are against it. What do studies say and should President Joe Biden sign the bill into law?

By Allison Troutner