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Science | Environmental Science | Oceanography

Oceanography is the study of the oceans as ecological systems. In this section, learn about topics like currents, deep-sea research or how rogue waves work.

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How Rip Currents Work

Rip currents are the number-one concern for beach lifeguards: About 80 percent of all beach rescues are related to rip currents. Learn what they are and what you should do if you get caught in one.


Why is the world's biggest landfill in the Pacific Ocean?

 Why is the world's biggest landfill in the Pacific Ocean?

The Great Pacific Garbage Patch, the world's largest landfill, is located in the middle of the Pacific. Read about the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. See more »

How Rogue Waves Work

 How Rogue Waves Work

Rogue waves are colossal waves that seem to appear out of nowhere. Learn about rogue waves and find out what can cause rogue waves to appear. See more »

Should we be worried about the dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico?

 Should we be worried about the dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico?

The Dead Zone is a vast area off the Gulf of Mexico, larger than several U.S. States, that is deadly to marine life. Learn more about the Dead Zone. See more »

How DEPTHX Works

 How DEPTHX Works

What would you need to explore an ocean on Europa, one of Jupiter's moons? Among other things, you'd need a submersible vehicle to explore the ocean and relate findings back to Earth. Stone Aerospace is developing just such a vehicle: the DEPTHX. See more »

How Rip Currents Work

 How Rip Currents Work

Rip currents are narrow, powerful currents of water that run from the beach out into the ocean. Learn how rip currents form and how to escape rip currents. See more »

 Why are the waves on the U.S. West Coast larger than the waves on the East Coast?

West coast waves in the U.S. are larger than those on the east coast. Find out why west coast waves are larger than east coast waves in this article. See more »

 How do they measure sea level?

How do they measure "sea level"? Is it the average of the tides? And is the sea level actually rising or not? See more »