Testing a CSMU

To ensure the quality and survivability of black boxes, manufacturers thoroughly test the CSMUs. Remember, only the CSMU has to survive a crash -- if accident investigators have that, they can retrieve the information they need. In order to test the unit, engineers load sample data onto the memory boards inside the CSMU. This pattern is reviewed on readout to determine if any of the data has been damaged by crash impact, fires or pressure.

There are several tests that make up the crash-survival sequence:

  • Crash impact - Researchers shoot the CSMU down an air cannon to create an impact of 3,400 Gs (1 G is the force of Earth's gravity, which determines how much something weighs). At 3,400 Gs, the CSMU hits an aluminum honeycomb target at a force equal to 3,400 times its weight. This impact force is equal to or in excess of what a recorder might experience in an actual crash.
  • Pin drop - To test the unit's penetration resistance, researchers drop a 500-pound (227-kilogram) weight with a 0.25-inch (0.64-centimeter) steel pin protruding from the bottom onto the CSMU from a height of 10 feet (3 meters). This pin, with 500 pounds behind it, impacts the CSMU cylinder's most vulnerable axis.
  • Static crush - For five minutes, researchers apply 5,000 pounds per square-inch (psi) of crush force to each of the unit's six major axis points.
  • Fire test - Researchers place the unit into a propane-source fireball, cooking it using three burners. The unit sits inside the fire at 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit (1,100 Celsius) for one hour. The FAA requires that all solid-state recorders be able to survive at least one hour at this temperature.
  • Deep-sea submersion - The CSMU is placed into a pressurized tank of salt water for 24 hours.
  • Salt-water submersion - The CSMU must survive in a salt water tank for 30 days.
  • Fluid immersion - Various CSMU components are placed into a variety of aviation fluids, including jet fuel, lubricants and fire-extinguisher chemicals.

During the fire test, the memory interface cable that attaches the memory boards to the circuit board is burned away. After the unit cools down, researchers take it apart and pull the memory module out. They restack the memory boards, install a new memory interface cable and attach the unit to a readout system to verify that all of the preloaded data is accounted for.

Black boxes are usually sold directly to and installed by the airplane manufacturers. Both black boxes are installed in the tail of the plane -- putting them in the back of the aircraft increases their chances of survival. The precise location of the recorders depends on the individual plane. Sometimes they are located in the ceiling of the galley, in the aft cargo hold or in the tail cone that covers the rear of the aircraft.