Emotions

What are the health benefits of laughter? What is happening in the brain when you're in love? What are the effects of isolation on the mind? Find out in these articles about human emotion.

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You think you'd know what happiness was -- you've felt it before, right? Not quite. It turns out that the definition of happiness pretty much depends on who's defining it.

By Josh Clark

Humans can express emotion in a variety of ways, from the written word to spoken communication. But what is it about music and art in particular that has the power to move us?

By Josh Clark

Studies seem to indicate that men are more likely to harbor violent tendencies than women. What factors do researchers use to come to these conclusions, and most importantly, is it true that men are more violent?

By Jonathan Strickland

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There's a connection between our physical bodies and the way it responds to emotion -- but scientists aren't quite sure what it is. Could it be that happiness is little more than a series of neurochemical responses to the world around us?

By Josh Clark

If someone tells you he or she possesses the secret of happiness, that person may also have a bridge to sell you. The things that make some people happy may lead to utter despair in others. As it turns out, humans may have to look into themselves to find happiness.

By Josh Clark

What constitutes happiness? Is it the absence of pain or an abundance of pleasure? It is simply a fortunate function of the brain? If it's the latter, then we should be able to manipulate it -- perhaps in the form of a "happy pill." It may surprise you, then, to learn that we already have one.

By Josh Clark

No man is an island -- unless he has a score of Twitter followers and Facebook friends but no one to go bowling with. Loneliness isn't just all in your head, but it definitely affects your brain.

By Molly Edmonds

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The great bullies that have graced the movie and television screen are mostly males, from Bluto to Biff Tannen. We tend to expect boys to throw the punches. But just because girls aren't bloodying noses on the playground doesn't mean they aren't fighting dirty.

By Molly Edmonds

If you want happiness, you have to go out and get it yourself. This epiphany led writer Gretchen Rubin to create The Happiness Project and spawn a movement of people in search of their own bliss.

By Josh Clark

Happiness is a wonderful thing. Unfortunately, it can also be elusive due to stress or depression. However, strategies abound that you can use to trick yourself into being happy. Ready for 10 of them?

By Josh Clark & Jessika Toothman

Sometimes a bad day calls for a cocktail -- or at the very least, a cookie or two. When you reach for that comfort, you're actually altering your brain chemistry. But there's a better way to do it: Lace up your running shoes.

By Tom Scheve

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Exercise, hot peppers, sex: All of these things are said to give you an endorphin rush. What's the science behind this chemical high -- and how do you keep it going?

By Tom Scheve

Thanksgiving may only come once a year, but you'll thank your lucky stars if you learn to count your blessings every day.

By Cristen Conger

Looking for love? Already in love? While not all relationships are meant to last, it's possible to avoid some of the pitfalls that can throw a relationship off-track.

By Shanna Freeman

We need food for sustenance and nutrition, but we also eat for pleasure. We like the way some things taste, and enjoy the experience of eating, but can food actually make us happy?

By Josh Clark

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Laugh tracks can sound corny and trite, especially when belly laughs erupt after a not particularly funny one-liner. Then why does the audience fall for it and join in?

By Molly Edmonds

Clowns might seem to have more foes than friends, but these entertainers are a key part of laughter therapy in hospitals. There is increasing evidence that a few hearty chuckles can help you along the road to recovery.

By Molly Edmonds

Traditional psychology has proven effective in studying and treating mental illness. However, some in the field want to study what makes patients happy instead of what makes them miserable.

By Josh Clark

When it erases your wrinkles, Botox also takes away your ability to frown. When your unhappy expression melts away, does your mood lift as well?

By Victoria Vogt

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Can you catch someone else's joy like you can catch a cold? Some researchers say that happiness is infectious -- and which people in your social network spread it best might surprise you.

By Molly Edmonds

Touch can be a very powerful thing that can dredge up all kinds of intense feelings. The lightest touch in the right place can induce laughter in the most taciturn people. Why?

By Josh Clark

Just as we can physically train muscles to become tighter and stronger, we can mentally train ourselves to draw more pleasure from the mundane. It takes discipline and a can-do attitude.

By Cristen Conger

From an adult's point of view, kids have it made, spending their days playing and goofing off, with no responsibilities to worry about. But are kids really jumping for joy more often than the rest of us?

By Tom Scheve

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"Early to bed and early to rise makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise" was Ben Franklin's advice in "Poor Richard's Almanack." Is it possible that happiness could be achieved by going to bed?

By Molly Edmonds

In the pursuit for happiness, we chase different things: a vibrant social life, the pitter-patter of little feet, a healthy lifestyle. What does science have to say about the key to a joyous life?

By Tom Scheve