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10 Unidentified Sounds That Scientists Are Seriously Looking Into


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The Max Headroom Incident
In 1989, an unknown hacker in a Max Headroom mask interrupted transmission on two Chicago TV stations and broadcast some cryptic gibberish. Public Domain
In 1989, an unknown hacker in a Max Headroom mask interrupted transmission on two Chicago TV stations and broadcast some cryptic gibberish. Public Domain

This one is unexplained, in that nobody knows who did it or how they did it. On Nov. 22, 1989, a hacker managed to take over the frequencies of two Chicago-area TV stations. The first time, during a CBS newscast, technicians shut it down in 30 seconds. But the second attack, against a public TV station, lasted well over a minute. The PBS drama cut out and a man in a Max Headroom mask appeared, broadcasting a cryptic audio message, with lines like "your love is fading" and a hummed snippet of the theme song from the cartoon "Clutch Cargo" [source: Finley].

An Federal Communications Commission investigator said that whoever did it could have used simple gear, but had to have a sophisticated knowledge of broadcasting technology.