Science Versus Myth

Are vampires real? What is an out-of-body experience? Are crop circles proof that aliens exist? HowStuffWorks explores what is real and what is urban legend with this collection of Science Versus Myth articles.


The original King of Monsters has become cute. How does that happen?

Humans are awesome and we have superpowers of our own. But could a greedy world of "supervillains" twist them against us?

More than 1,000 people have gone missing from U.S. national parks. Are there reasonable explanations or is there something more sinister at work?

According to new research, many people believe wildly inaccurate myths about the brain and learning — even those who know a lot about neuroscience.

No crew, sails set, fire still blazing in the galley — some ships wash up on shores under mysterious circumstances. The Resolven was one of them.

Many people have sworn to have spotted Bigfoot. But does the elusive hominid exist?

When a super-realistic android or video character gives us a creepy feeling, it enters the uncanny valley. Why do we get spooked, and what can we do to avoid it?

Covfefe isn't as mysterious as everyone makes it out to be. We're here to explain.

Can infrasound explain away ghosts, hauntings and other paranormal activity?

It turns out you can't just scatter your loved one's ashes anywhere. So what can you do with them?

Dragon fire is an awe-inspiring thing, but exactly how would it happen? Real-world clues from nature point the way.

A mysterious warrior with a silver arm? A giant subterranean king who could kill with a single glance? A dog-headed, overprotective mother? Yes! And more...

Depending on which state you live in, you may be able to bury your loved ones in your garden. But there are some things to think about.

New studies found no link between back pain, arthritis and the temperature, air pressure or humidity.

Some physics students did the calculations, and the results are not pretty.

So many people are getting cremated these days that we're starting to get pretty creative about what we do with all those ashes.

It's that creepy time of year again, and Dr. Anton Jessup is back for another series of Monster Science. In this episode, he meets up with some unexpected vampire vixens.

Thousands of years ago, the Babylonians created the zodiac and dropped a constellation when it didn't quite fit into their schematic. Its name? Opiuchus.

If mental strain caused a bloody nose, academic testing sites would be awash in crimson. So why do we still see psychic nosebleeds from "Stranger Things" to "Scanners"?

Top atmospheric scientists say there's no evidence those lines in the sky are part of some sinister government plot. But will that dissuade conspiracy theorists?

Not sure what chemtrails are or where you stand on them? A newly published, peer-reviewed examination of the chemtrail hypothesis could be for you. We have the scoop.

A bunch of Yale physicists decided to give Schrodinger's cat not one but two boxes. And that, strangely enough, could eventually prove handy for quantum computing.

The Chinese monk was preserved in a ceramic vessel for almost four years, and turned into a statue to inspire others to devote themselves to the practice.

Humans have only been bipedal for a sliver of history. What if we returned our spines to their original position and quit walking upright? What would that world be like?