Transportation

Many of us take public transportation or fly in airplanes on a regular basis, but have you ever wondered how all of these things work? This collection of transportation articles help explain how people get from place to place.

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The Boeing 737 first flew into the world a half century ago. Here's the scoop on Boeing's fastest-selling airplane.

By Patrick J. Kiger

Your pilot apologizes for your plane leaving late but then assures you she can make up the lost time in the sky. Is she pressing extra-hard on the accelerator or what?

By Nathan Chandler

Ever sat on an airplane and wondered how your laptop works at 30,000 feet?

By Patrick J. Kiger

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The Dubai police force got the world's first legal personal drone. Are these flying motorbikes coming to streets near you?

By Cherise Threewitt

With 36,000 workers, it has its own fire department, banks, day care facilities, medical clinic and water treatment plant.

By Patrick J. Kiger

Airlines keep cramming in more and more seats, making flying nearly unbearable for some. But does that also make it unsafe?

By Dave Roos

You better know the rules before you get out and fly your drone or you could end up violating FAA regulations.

By Kristen Hall-Geisler

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HowStuffWorks explains how physics helps animals get airborne.

Pilots on international flights use aviation English, a stripped-down, specialized version of the language, to communicate with air traffic controllers.

By Patrick J. Kiger

Commercial flight is extremely safe. But could it be even safer if airplanes had shoulder harnesses instead of lap belts?

By John Donovan

Train crashes are in the news lately, but are our fears justified?

By Stell Simonton

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The Department of Homeland Security announced it is extending the REAL ID full enforcement date by 19 months to allow states time to get up and fully operational after the COVID-19 pandemic shut down many licensing offices.

By Cherise Threewitt

What does Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport's massive power failure tell us about U.S. infrastructure and vulnerability?

By John Donovan

Camera-equipped commercial drones are cheaper and require less training. Is it time to say goodbye to your local eye-in-the-sky traffic reports?

By Patrick J. Kiger

And in less than a decade they could save you from being stuck in heavy traffic.

By Tracy Staedter

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It's happened to all of us. You're at the front of the line, about to board, when you realize you can't find your paper boarding pass. Or it won't pull up on your phone. Facial recognition technology could change that — and help with security, too.

By Tracy Staedter

The Google co-founder is reportedly is building a giant airship that to deliver humanitarian supplies and double as a flying yacht. He's not the only one with an eye to the sky.

By Patrick J. Kiger

Predicting turbulence isn't an exact science, but airline pilots use a variety of tools both high-tech and low before asking you to buckle up.

By Patrick J. Kiger

A drone bird's the word at Canada's Edmonton International Airport.

By Tracy Staedter

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New atmospheric analysis shows that a changing climate will make both common and severe turbulence significantly more likely in decades to come.

By Chris Opfer

Dutch researchers are proposing banked, continuous runways to handle traffic more efficiently and take up less space.

By Patrick J. Kiger

Honeybees could get help pollinating crops in the future from an unlikely source: drones.

By John Perritano

It used to be that air travelers complained about not having enough legroom. But with airlines jamming more seats into planes, there’s less room for their heads, too.

By Patrick J. Kiger

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And it could be even faster and quieter than all you jet-setters are used to.

By Jonathan Strickland

In 2015, the U.S. population numbered 320 million, but less than 10 percent of those people rode the rails. So who does?

By Julia Layton