Conservation Issues

Conservation issues are a growing concern for most scientists. As humans continue to consume natural resources, many organisms are headed for extinction. Conservation issues include the protection of trees, animals and wetlands.

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Helium balloons are dangerous to the environment and wildlife — so why isn't releasing them illegal?

By Jesslyn Shields

Cape Town, South Africa, population 3.7 million, could become the first city on the planet to run out of water. But it may not be the last.

By Patrick J. Kiger

If you think climate change is bad now, two scientists estimate what it would be like without our protected forests.

By Jamie Allen

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A study of more than 1,000 soil samples found that organic farming methods help soil retain carbon significantly more than traditional methods.

By Shaun Chavis

A new study on The Nature Conservancy's pilot BirdReturns program finds that renting rice fields from farmers for migrating birds works.

By Tracy Staedter

And your smartphone may be part of the problem; mining rare minerals needed to make them is pushing endangered apes to extinction.

By Laurie L. Dove

Removing the ban could help manage the animals and save money, but it could also mean the horses will be sold for their meat.

By Patrick J. Kiger

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Henderson Island has a human population of zero, and the highest density of litter anywhere in the world.

By Jesslyn Shields

Wildness is a necessity, as naturalist John Muir once wrote. And it helps if that wildness isn't drowned out by man-made noise pollution.

By Amanda Onion

As the world becomes more urbanized, the demand for sand, a key ingredient of concrete, keeps growing. But there's only so much sand to go around.

By Dave Roos

A wall spanning a continent would alter the environment for the worse, with its impact felt across numerous species and ecosystems.

By Jesslyn Shields

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The OneLessStraw campaign encourages people to kick their straw habit to keep plastic from harming the environment.

By Kate Kershner

China has a voracious appetite for elephant ivory, but the country plans to shut down its ivory market by the end of 2017. Will it be enough to save the elephants?

By Jesslyn Shields

New findings about ancient, extinct Australasian bandicoot and bilby species underscore how dire things are today when even survivors like these are struggling.

By Jesslyn Shields

A new study shows how, years after the disaster, oil from the disaster has made its way into terrestrial species.

By Jesslyn Shields

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Five trillion cigarettes are discarded each year globally. New research looks at the metal content of those on just one beach in the Persian Gulf.

By Karen Kirkpatrick

The temporary installation joins the four bronze Barbary lion statues in London's Trafalgar Square; it highlights the rapid ongoing decline in worldwide lion population.

By Christopher Hassiotis

Variety isn't just the spice of life; it's the currency of all well-functioning ecosystems great and small. What happens that currency is in trouble?

By John Perritano

With the world's population expanding and its arable land shrinking, how in the world are we going to have enough food to feed everyone? Here are five ways.

By Becky Striepe

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The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is explained in this article. Learn about the Great Pacific Garbage Patch explained.

By Jaymi Heimbuch

Without its keystone, a Roman aqueduct collapses. Does the same travesty befall an ecosystem when a keystone species goes missing from the ecological equation?

By William Harris

Insects and biodiversity go hand in hand. Without insects our planet would not survive as they are essential to biodiversity. Check out this gallery on the relationship between insects and biodiversity.

Biodiversity means rainforests and reefs teeming with species right? There's more to it than that though. Genetic diversity has a big role to play, too. Just ask that cheetah cub.

By William Harris

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Men have been hunting and killing whales for centuries. Early whalers hunted for survival, but their motivation may have changed once there was money to be made. Whaling for profit has been banned since 1986, but whaling for scientific research is still allowed in certain areas, causing much debate.

By Alison Kim Perry

Flagship species like leopards, whales and wolves grace wildlife calendars, bring in big conservation dollars and help regulate their ecosystems. But what about the tiny guys you won't find on your calendar? How important are they to Earth's biodiversity?

By Jessika Toothman