Green Science

Green Science is the application of eco-friendly thinking to scientific disciplines. Learn about global warming, pollution and other impacts on nature and the planet, plus what we can do to combat them.

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Between planned obsolescence and our thirst for new gadgets, we're awash in old electronics -- or e-waste. Some countries and states are writing laws to govern the disposal of technological refuse.

By Maria Trimarchi

Is the same substance that makes your shampoo so pleasantly sudsy really going to give you cancer? Here's the real dirt on whether sodium lauryl sulfate is bad for you.

By Julia Layton & Valerie Stimac

You traded in your old car for a hybrid, bought organic sheets and even offset your last flight's carbon emissions. But is going green really all about what you buy?

By Julia Layton

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The United States may have sat out on the Kyoto Protocol, but that didn't stop a domestic private carbon market from springing up and thriving. What is the CCX, and how do you trade nothing for something?

By Maria Trimarchi

Can you walk to restaurants from your home? Or do you have to hop in the car for every outing? How do you determine your neighborhood's walkability without taking to the streets yourself?

By Maria Trimarchi

After sloughing off your dead skin, what happens to those plastic microbeads that wash down the drain? Some make it all the way to the ocean and linger until they become a very unhealthy supper.

By Julia Layton

If your nearest source for food specializes in hot dogs, ice and a wide variety of potato chips, you might be living in a food desert. What's so dangerous about these barren regions?

By Maria Trimarchi

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Think about all the water that goes down the drain every day. What if the energy of that rushing water could be harnessed and turned into real power. One company has a plan that promises to do just that.

By Julia Layton

We've been warned plenty about the mercury content of fish. And most of us know our new high-efficiency CFLs also contain the shiny neurotoxin. So which source should cause us more concern?

By Julia Layton

If ranchers and landowners invest in grass banks, will their payout be nothing but green? Or is grass banking a temporary solution, delaying Mother Nature's inevitable bankruptcy?

By Jennifer Horton

While global warming has long been spun as the environmentalist's cause, its consequences are now affecting sportsmen and their quarry. How is the changing climate transforming hunting season?

By Julia Layton

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Many workers are trading in their blue or white collars for one that's a bright shade of green. Are these new jobs in environmental fields the way of the future or just a fad?

By Stephanie Watson

You may think of corn as something you slather in butter and salt and wolf down at dinner. But everyone's favorite summertime vegetable has a new look, and it may be reducing our dependence on foreign oil.

By Robert Lamb

We humans like to trade one problem for another. We give up drinking only to take up smoking. Will we also exchange a reliance on dwindling fossil fuels for a food shortage caused by ethanol production?

By Robert Lamb

In today's wired world, everybody wants more power. But how do energy utilities manage the demand for electricity? Would you be shocked to know you can help?

By Maria Trimarchi

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What's a good way to make solar power affordable? Find a way to generate more electricity in a smaller area. You can do it -- just concentrate.

By Julia Layton

While we might groan when gas prices soar, the price hike could have a positive effect on our waistlines. Does paying more at the pump mean lowered rates of obesity?

By Maria Trimarchi

Haunted by ideas of your body polluting the Earth after you're gone? Microbial fuel cell technology could allow you to harness the energy of your own decomposition to power batteries.

By Maria Trimarchi

Sustainable urbanism is no longer a futuristic dream. Welcome to five cities around the world that will be turning a radical shade of green in the coming decades.

By Maria Trimarchi

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As high-yield oil supplies become harder to find, energy companies are turning to oil sands: mixtures of bitumen, sand and water. How do you extract oil from mucky, viscous soil?

By Maria Trimarchi

While it's good to be environmentally accountable, too much eco-angst can spiral into an actual anxiety disorder. What makes people lose sleep thinking about their big, muddy carbon footprints?

By Stephanie Watson

Buying organic and planting trees can make you feel better about the planet — but it’s tougher to quantify how much they really help. What are some other myths about going green?

By Maria Trimarchi

If you love leaping into mounds of fallen leaves, you might have to jump into a big pile of nothing one autumn -- global warming could affect these little seasonal distractions.

By Jennifer Horton

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What if the land you relied upon simply blew away? In the 1930s, poor stewardship and crushing drought created black blizzards and an internal American exodus known as the Dust Bowl.

By Maria Trimarchi

For the people who eke out an existence in Africa's semiarid Sahel region south of the Sahara, a shift in climate is nothing short of disastrous. What makes the Sahel so unstable, and why is it shifting?

By Maria Trimarchi