Green Technology

Green technology is technology that produces clean energy, helps repair environmental damages or offers solutions to wasteful practices.


As sea levels rise with climate change, beaches are losing ground against ever-encroaching waters. Trucking in sand may seem like a good idea, but the evidence, while not yet conclusive, may show otherwise.

People have floated the idea of towing icebergs to drought-stricken parts of the world for years. Sounds like a good idea, but how viable is it?

While plastic such as Styrofoam may be cheap and convenient to use, it contributes to costly health issues and is an inconvenient pollutant that takes up to 500 years to biodegrade.

Wine pomace — the portion of grapes left over from winemaking — has a variety of uses, from fertilizer to a nutrition-enhancing ingredient in foods.

Fog harvesting has been going on in some form since ancient times, but scientists have been refining the method so people living in some of the most arid climates can have water.

There's no easy fix for climate change so scientists are playing with altering the Earth's natural systems in hopes of slowing it down. What could possibly go wrong?

Human attempts to alter the Earth's natural systems could either successfully avert climate change or fail and cause even greater harm.

In Colorado, a recycling robot uses artificial intelligence to sort through discarded cartons more efficiently.

China, the world's largest emitter of CO2, is making steps to combat those emissions by creating the world's largest floating solar panel farm.

Some scientists are proposing a massive array of wind-powered pumps to bring more Arctic water to the surface, so it can freeze and thicken existing sea ice.

A French company has created a miniature wind turbine that looks like a tree and could provide enough energy for a house.

The big problem of cleaning water quickly and cheaply might just have been solved, thanks to this tiny gadget.

And they're ready to help you do it, whether it's just you, your school, your company or your neighborhood.

Scientists are tickled pink about all the environmental uses for the orange peel.

Drones and other unmanned flying machines are going green.

These days, it seems everyone is "going green." From individuals to businesses, everyone is looking for ways to be more sustainable and environmentally-friendly. But is green tech the way of the future or just another fad?

We live in an age when DIY has taken on exciting, nerve-wracking connotations. Add in some knowledge and some money from crowdfunding sites like Kickstarter, and you have a recipe for a transformed world. Will glow-in-the-dark plants be a part of it?

As far back as 1500 B.C.E., people were trying to purify water to make it drinkable. And we're still at it. Today inventors use tools as simple as clay and as sophisticated as carbon nanotubes to bring clean water to the world.

Imagine a different kind of light bulb, one that lasted as long as a fluorescent bulb, but without the buzz, as energy-efficient as a CFL but with a more pleasing light. Meet the FIPEL bulb.

The rising cost and projected scarcity of fossil fuels has people talking. But finding a new power source and developing an infrastructure will be costly and challenging. Will we still be using gasoline in 2050?

We live in a universe of clocks. The technology may not sound as dependable as your cell phone alarm clock, but humans have turned to water-powered clocks for more than three and a half millennia.

Electronics use a lot of juice. So what's an environmentally responsible citizen to do? Going solar might just be the answer.

There is no accepted standard of what makes a "green" gadget. With that in mind, here are five devices that do not use any energy at all or that find novel ways to rethink a common gadget while also making environmental improvements.

If you're like most folks, you spend a few hours a day on the computer. What changes can you make to save power without compromising the way your work?

When you take a shower, the hot water moves quickly from the showerhead down the drain. What if you could reclaim that wasted heat to warm up new water?