Environmental Science

The environment is truly a thing of beauty and should be protected whenever possible. What can we do to save the environment, and what new technology is available to help us?

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Buying organic and planting trees can make you feel better about the planet — but it’s tougher to quantify how much they really help. What are some other myths about going green?

By Maria Trimarchi

When some people hear the word "dinosaur," they immediately think of outdated technology. Does that mean that the dinosaurs themselves were failures?

By Tracy V. Wilson

If you love leaping into mounds of fallen leaves, you might have to jump into a big pile of nothing one autumn -- global warming could affect these little seasonal distractions.

By Jennifer Horton

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The Dead Sea is host to tourists who visit in droves to soak in its mineral-rich waters. Is the saltiest body of water in the world about to dry up?

By Alia Hoyt

What if the land you relied upon simply blew away? In the 1930s, poor stewardship and crushing drought created black blizzards and an internal American exodus known as the Dust Bowl.

By Maria Trimarchi

For the people who eke out an existence in Africa's semiarid Sahel region south of the Sahara, a shift in climate is nothing short of disastrous. What makes the Sahel so unstable, and why is it shifting?

By Maria Trimarchi

Laws, treaties and the limits of human technology have kept some petroleum reserves just beyond the reach of oil companies. So where are they dying to drill?

By Robert Lamb

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Many scientists believe that the impact from a massive asteroid was what killed off the dinosaurs. It's what started the Age of Mammals. But what if the asteroid had missed?

By Tracy V. Wilson

Winning first prize at the school science fair is one thing, but what if your project really made a difference? Could your project really change the world?

Electrifying dance moves might impress your friends, but they usually don't help power the club you're dancing in. What's piezoelectricity, and how could it help twist the future of energy generation?

By Maria Trimarchi

Drilling down thousands of feet in lightless ocean depths and transporting that oil to the surface without spilling it isn't exactly easy. Did we mention the rough seas?

By Robert Lamb

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Sometimes dinosaur fossils are too large and heavy to display without damaging them. How are those enormous models built? And what makes them look so realistic?

By Tracy V. Wilson

Sure, the Emerald City looked green, but you won't need green-tinted glasses to see how environmentally friendly the cities on this list are. What makes a city amazingly green?

By Maria Trimarchi & Jacob Clifton

Ever since its discovery in 2000, a dinosaur fossil named Leonardo has held the interest of paleontologists the world over. A 3-D model of the animal even toured the world. So what's the big deal?

By Tracy V. Wilson

Usually we're focused on our personal power consumption -- wondering why our gas bill went up or took a dip. But what if we added up everybody's power consumption? How much would it be?

By Maria Trimarchi

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Many people think that beautiful, blazing sunsets are one upside to living with the smog that hangs over polluted cities. Are they right? Does smog actually enhance sunsets?

By Julia Layton

L.A. and ancient Rome have more in common than a culture of excess. Both cities turned to complex systems of siphons and aqueducts to solve their water problems.

By Julia Layton

Depending on who you ask, urban sprawl is either the best thing that ever happened to growing families -- or the downfall of civilization and the environment as we know it. Learn about the history and consequences of this American phenomenon.

By Alia Hoyt

Scientists believe that water pressure kept many dinosaurs from swimming. But does that mean that none of these massive animals took a prehistoric skinny-dip?

By Tracy V. Wilson

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There's no transdermal patch to help the United States end its addiction to oil. As gas prices rise and pollution spreads, can anything break our gasoholic tendencies?

By Jennifer Horton

A high demand for lumber and paper can lead to deforestation, which can deplete forests, threaten wildlife and contribute to global warming. That's where the Forest Stewardship Council certification comes in.

By Jane McGrath

Are multipurpose plastic bags or those throwback brown paper bags more environmentally friendly? That question could leave you speechless on your next trip to the grocery store.

By Jane McGrath

For those who reduce, reuse and recycle to the beat of their own drum, here are some of the wackier ways to help better the environment and lessen carbon footprints.

By Jennifer Horton & Patrick J. Kiger

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For all of its cleanliness, wind power has long been linked to the grisly deaths of birds. Why did one range in California earn turbines the name "bird-o-matics"?

By Julia Layton

Some people believe that dinosaurs were relatives of today's birds. But, you might ask, if that's so, why didn't they have feathers? Funny you should ask.

By Tracy V. Wilson