Inside the Mind

What are dreams really made of? Are humans the smartest animal? What causes schizophrenia? Travel inside the mind and find out how the human brain works.

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The human brain might just be Pandora's box. Will we like what we find when we really take a look? It might just depend on how you interpret the data.

By Kate Kershner

You've probably experienced that moment where you're driving, get lost, turn down the radio, and then think, "Why did I just do that?" Hopefully, you got to your destination, but did you ever figure out why you turned down the tunes?

By Maria Trimarchi

Nostalgia, contrary to centuries of common knowledge, appears to be a good thing. A really good thing.

By Julia Layton

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Christian Sager interviews Dr. Jennifer Watson on how parts of the brain affect why we are the way we are. Learn more about your physiological personality in this interview from HowStuffWorks. Music: Land on the Golden Gate - by: Chris Zabriskie

Why does the experience of sleep paralysis often summon explanations of demonic visitations? Visit the place where dreams and reality overlap, and where science and myth attempt to interpret our hallucinations.

By Robert Lamb

Have you ever met someone with a unique first name, and then all of a sudden you hear the name everywhere you turn? That's the Baader-Meinhof phenomenon at work. How did it get that handle?

By Kate Kershner

Are you someone who likes to be social, but also values a little alone time? Are you sometimes critical of yourself? You are? Amazing! So how did we guess without actually knowing you? Welcome, friends, to the Forer effect.

By Kate Kershner

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Does your brain experience the kind of back-ups you see during your commute? Or are your neurons prone to road rage?

By Bambi Turner

Intelligence tests are not often accurate measures of intelligence. Learn more about intelligence tests and some of the more inaccurate ones in this video from HowStuffWorks.

The same characteristics that help turn songs into earworms also help our brains store important bits of information. Why does the human brain love mad rhymes?

By Laurie L. Dove

A friend may joke that he remembers going through a long, dark tunnel into a blinding white light – and being hit on the bottom by a doctor. But in general, most people don't remember being born or learning to walk. Why is that?

By Laurie L. Dove

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Your stomach is growling, your boss is demanding and the cereal you ate for breakfast is a distant memory. Could having a little snack save you from (unwisely) screaming at your supervisor?

By John Perritano

Any kid knows that cuddling a plush toy is comforting. But with robotics added to the fluffy mix, stuffed animals can become therapeutic for elderly dementia patients.

By Maria Trimarchi

When you see someone yawning, even in a picture, chances are a yawning urge will come over you, too. But is this also true of sneezing, and if so, why?

By Laurie L. Dove

It's a wild world. One with all kinds of kooky and unexpected connections. Like the one between big brains and binge drinking. Or big brains and big hips. Here's a look at some of the head scratching-est correlations uncovered by researchers.

By Chris Opfer

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No one likes being told they've done wrong, whether it's from a boss, spouse or parent. How can you do a better job of giving "constructive criticism" without coming across as obnoxious?

By Laurie L. Dove

Odd as it may seem, many antidepressants like Zoloft having warning labels about increases in suicidal thoughts. Why would that be? And how will you know if your medication is actually working?

By Laurie L. Dove

Most of us don't intuitively classify electroshocks as therapeutic, but this 1950s-era treatment has changed a lot since it was first introduced. When and why do mental health experts now turn to it?

By Kate Kershner

A 2013 study in the Lancet showed that five mental and developmental disorders share several genetic variations. Does that mean that nature influences your mental health more than nurture?

By Kate Kershner

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It doesn't take long to watch a movie and figure out who the evil genius is. In real life, though, figuring out if someone made an intelligent decision to do harm is a lot more slippery.

By Kate Kershner

We often throw around the word "insanity" for acts that seem to have no rational explanation (like a teacher giving an insanely difficult test). Legally speaking, though, it's actually a narrow term that's very difficult to prove in court.

By Chris Opfer

Is there any truth to the stereotype of the mad scientist? Turns out there is a link between high IQs and mental illness. Researchers are still not sure why.

By Laurie L. Dove

We've all seen "flame wars" on the Internet. Maybe we've been the victims or the perpetrators, too. But what causes people to say things online that they would never say in person?

By Laurie L. Dove

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Having a Ph.D., four stars on your general's uniform or a seat in the Oval Office won't necessarily stop you from doing things that make others want to whack you on the head with a "how could you?" Here are 10 who should've thought twice.

By Becky Striepe

Who doesn't want to instantly gobble up the marshmallows floating delectably on top of their hot chocolate? As it turns out, giving in to or delaying that impulse can say a lot about you -- and your willpower. Ready to see how strong yours is?

By Robert Lamb