How Radiation Sickness Works

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  • Aref, Dr. Lana. "Nuclear Energy: the Good, the Bad, and the Debatable." Massachusetts Institute of Technology. (Accessed April 18, 2011)
  • Goldman, Bruce. "Nightmare in Manhattan: if terrorists exploded a nuke in the heart of a big city, how would we cope with the epidemic of radiation sickness that would inevitably follow." New Scientist, 189.2543 (2006).
  • Kruesi, Liz. 2006. "What the human body can withstand." Astronomy 34, no. 3: 68. (Accessed April 18, 2011).
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