Chemical Processes and Tests

Chemical processes and tests allow chemists to ascertain the properties of various substances. By utilizing chemical processes and tests, scientists can look at life on the atomic level. Click here to find some articles on chemical processes and tests.


Watch: The Chemistry of Sparklers Explained in Slow-motion Video

There's some serious science behind the sparkle, with different metals, compounds and other elements creating the fun firework.

What Makes This Video of Things Melting So Satisfying?

YouTube channel Let's Melt This has become an internet sensation. Why are we so mesmerized by videos of everyday objects undergoing phase change?

Skunk Water: A Weapon That Uses Stench to Control Crowds

Developed in Israel, this foul-smelling liquid has been used on Palestinian and Israeli protesters … and it's showing up in the United States.

What's a monomer?

These small molecules are the foundation for much bigger things, from ordinary household products around us to essential components within our bodies.

What's a polymer?

Polymers are the basic components in so many of the products we use each day.

What is Avogadro’s number?

That's one seriously big number, and technically Amedeo Avogadro didn't even come up with it. So how did the Italian chemist make such an indelible (numerical) mark on the wonderful world of chemistry?

How Mass Spectrometry Works

Mass spectrometry enables the major league to sniff out athletes guilty of doping. It can also help us locate oil or design a killer perfume. Who says chemistry isn't cool?

How Human Experimentation Works

Everyone from the father of anatomy to modern-day pharmaceutical companies has used humans as guinea pigs. Do we always need live test subjects to advance science?

What if someone released a large amount of helium into a small space?

When you speak, a stream of air flows up your trachea from your lungs. And when you add helium, your voice rises several octaves. So if you filled the air with helium, just how high would your voice get?

What if I touched dry ice?

If you were to touch dry ice, it wouldn't be anything like touching water ice. So what's it like? Is it hot or cold? And would it leave a mark?