CHEMICAL PROCESSES AND TESTS

Chemical processes and tests allow chemists to ascertain the properties of various substances. By utilizing chemical processes and tests, scientists can look at life on the atomic level. Click here to find some articles on chemical processes and tests.
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How does rust work?

Rust is the common name for iron oxide, which is created when iron bonds with oxygen. In fact, pure iron is only rarely found in nature because it interacts with oxygen so easily.

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  • Biting on aluminum foil can be painful. Why?

    Biting on aluminum foil can be painful. Why?

    Biting on aluminum foil can be painful -- basically, when you bite on foil, you build a battery in your mouth. Ouch! See more »

  • How Helium Balloons Work

    How Helium Balloons Work

    Helium balloons tend to fascinate adults and children alike (and it's not just the Donald Duck voice thing, though that is a big draw). Learn all about helium and why it floats! See more »

  • How Human Experimentation Works

    How Human Experimentation Works

    Everyone from the father of anatomy to modern-day pharmaceutical companies has used humans as guinea pigs. Do we always need live test subjects to advance science? See more »

  • How Luminol Works

    How Luminol Works

    Have you seen investigators on crime shows who spray some stuff on a "clean" carpet and suddenly -- blood stains! Well, of all the fictional technology on TV, it turns out this stuff is real! Find out how luminol reveals the blood. See more »

  • How Mass Spectrometry Works

    How Mass Spectrometry Works

    Mass spectrometry enables the major league to sniff out athletes guilty of doping. It can also help us locate oil or design a killer perfume. Who says chemistry isn't cool? See more »

  • What if I put aluminum foil in the microwave?

    What if I put aluminum foil in the microwave?

    We've all been told not to put aluminum foil in the microwave. Stories of incredible explosions and fires are usually at the center of these ominous warnings. Why is that? See more »

  • What if I touched dry ice?

    What if I touched dry ice?

    If you were to touch dry ice, it wouldn't be anything like touching water ice. So what's it like? Is it hot or cold? And would it leave a mark? See more »

  • What if someone released a large amount of helium into a small space?

    What if someone released a large amount of helium into a small space?

    When you speak, a stream of air flows up your trachea from your lungs. And when you add helium, your voice rises several octaves. So if you filled the air with helium, just how high would your voice get? See more »

  • What is Avogadro’s number?

    What is Avogadro’s number?

    That's one seriously big number, and technically Amedeo Avogadro didn't even come up with it. So how did the Italian chemist make such an indelible (numerical) mark on the wonderful world of chemistry? See more »

  • What is Ricin?

    What is Ricin?

    One person lay in critical condition on Feb. 29, 2008, after the deadly biotoxin ricin was found in his Las Vegas hotel room. What is ricin, and why is it so dangerous? See more »

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