Civil Engineering

We see bridges, buildings and highways on a daily basis, but have you ever wondered how these structures are designed and built? These civil engineering articles help explain this very question.

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London without the Tube? New York without its underground scene? Atlantans gliding straight from their MARTA stops to the airport? What would life be like without our underground transportation system?

By Tracy V. Wilson

If you were on the road for the holidays, you probably spent some time staring at the bumper in front of you. Can you imagine a world without gridlock?

By Kevin Bonsor

I've noticed that the insides of road and subway tunnels are usually covered in ceramic tile. Is there any particular reason for this or is it simply convention?

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Is there any rhyme or reason to how U.S. interstate highways are numbered?

While traveling along the Interstate, you may have noticed that truck weigh stations occasionally dot the highway. What are these weigh stations for, and how do they measure the weight of a truck? Find out the answer in this article.

In the news about the recent accident at a ski resort in Austria, the reporters called the cable car that carried the skiers up the mountain a "funicular railway." What is that and how does it work?

We are a species of bridge builders. Since time began, humans have engineered structures to vault over obstacles with the help of logs, stone, steel and, of course, ingenuity. So, what keeps our bridges steadfast and strong?

By Robert Lamb, Michael Morrissey & Patrick J. Kiger