Engineering

Engineering is the discipline of design and construction of mechanical devices, equipment, structures and public works systems. Topics include aircraft technologies, buildings, bridges, robotics and heavy machinery.

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Building bicycles with environmentally friendly bamboo is an idea whose time has come. We talk to a master bamboo bike builder about the ins and outs.

By Carrie Tatro

Could a computer chip implanted in our brains make the necessity of actually learning anything, like a language, obsolete because knowledge will be available for streaming 24/7?

By Patrick J. Kiger

The U.S. has some of the longest highways in the world, but the nine longest are scattered all over the globe.

By Jesslyn Shields

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Is ChatGPT the end of education as we know it, or just the beginning?

By Jesslyn Shields

The Kola Superdeep Borehole is the deepest man-made hole on Earth. It's so deep, locals swear you can hear the screams of souls tortured in hell. Why did the Russians dig this deep, and why did they stop?

By Jennifer Walker-Journey

Bridges connect people and places, with inspired engineering and views that can't be beat. Here are the 10 longest in the world.

By Laurie L. Dove

Splish-splash is not the sound you want to hear when you're standing in front of a urinal. A new design is being touted as the answer to the splashless pee.

By Kate Morgan

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Crinkle crankle walls undulate, mimicking the shape of a snake's slither. But what's the purpose of these wavy walls?

By Jennifer Walker-Journey

Computer-generated artificial celebrities, created with cutting-edge technology, have become some of the hottest social media stars on the planet, selling everything from insurance to perfume.

By Patrick J. Kiger

SCIFs are spy-proof, highly secure facilities designed for viewing and working with sensitive national security secrets. We talk to a former general counsel for the NSA to find out how they work.

By Patrick J. Kiger

Before 1933, getting around London on the massively confusing Tube system was a nightmare. That's when draftsman Harry Beck stepped in and revolutionized map design.

By Patrick J. Kiger

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Some of the most momentous occasions in the life of the United Kingdom have taken place in Westminster Abbey, including the funeral of Queen Elizabeth II, Sept. 19, 2022.

By Kate Morgan

Maillardet's Automaton, built around 1800, can write poems and draw pictures and was a precursor to today's sophisticated robots.

By Patrick J. Kiger

At 984 feet tall, Paris' landmark Eiffel Tower is no picnic to maintain, so how is it done and who is responsible for keeping it standing and painted?

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

Saudi Arabia's proposal to build a 106-mile-long, self-sufficient, road- and car-free, one-building city would make it the first of its kind in the world.

By Laurie L. Dove

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In the last few decades, there's been a sort of arms race to build ever-taller skyscrapers. Which seven currently rank as the world's tallest buildings?

By Alia Hoyt

A Google engineer made headlines for claiming that an AI called LaMDA had become sentient or conscious. While many AI scientists disagreed, what would it take for an AI to ever become sentient?

By Chris Pollette

It's been some 15 years in the making and is still under construction. What's the real story behind the Jeddah Tower's delay?

By Dave Roos

Drinking fountains have faced a challenge from bottled water, but they seem to be making a comeback. By the way, we throw away over 60 million PET water bottles every day in the U.S. alone.

By Patrick J. Kiger

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Smart traffic lights monitor traffic and continuously adjust their timing to improve flow, and can even help disabled or elderly pedestrians navigate crosswalks. Could they be a solution to the problems of traffic stress and road rage?

By Patrick J. Kiger

Gothic architecture first appeared in France in the late Middle Ages. Some of the world's most stunning cathedrals were built using its key architectural elements.

By Lauren David

Standing 1,428 feet tall and just 60 feet wide, Steinway Tower in New York City has earned the nickname, "The Coffee Stirrer."

By Patty Rasmussen

Stanford researchers emulated the feet and legs of a peregrine falcon to enable a flying robot to land and perch on various surfaces, which could have lasting implications for future drone design and use.

By Patrick J. Kiger

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Smart buildings have technology embedded inside them, allowing unprecedented levels of interaction between a building and its occupants. Some would call it "unprecedented levels of snooping."

By Patrick Lecomte

The Hongshui River Scenic Park walkway is shaped like a super- colossal, brightly colored butterfly and is twice as long as the island of Manhattan.

By Carrie Tatro