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Engineering

Engineering is the discipline of design and construction of mechanical devices, equipment, structures and public works systems. Topics include aircraft technologies, buildings, bridges, robotics and heavy machinery.

Topics to Explore

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How ConnectR Works

Created for social purposes, it’s meant to act as a virtual presence, helping keep far-off relatives and late-working parents connected to their families. What is it? A robot called the ConnectR.

How Pyramids Work

When pyramids come to mind, most of us think of Egypt, but pyramids exist in many parts of the world. How were they constructed without earth-moving or heavy-lift machinery? And most of all, why were these amazing structures built?

Michelangelo Buildings

Michelangelo was not only a great sculptor; he was also a master builder. He loved cities over nature and although had many architectural feats under his name, he often declared that he was not an architect. See the famous buildings of Michelangelo.

How Roller Coasters Work

They don't have engines, brakes or accelerators. No, these amazing machines rely on physical, centripetal and gravitational forces to urge thrills, screams and that sinking stomach feeling we all love (and hate). Read more about the science of fun.

How ASIMO Works

It walks, it talks and it works as a receptionist. Honda engineers have been busy creating the ASIMO robot for more than 20 years, and it shows.

How Subways Work

London without the Tube? New York without its underground scene? Atlantans gliding straight from their MARTA stops to the airport? What would life be like without our underground transportation system?

How Biomechatronics Works

In the TV series "The Six Million Dollar Man," scientists restore a crippled test pilot who lost legs one arm and an eye. While this is total fiction, an emerging field known as biomechatronics is coming close to this vision.

How Tunnels Work

A tunnel can be simply defined as a tube hollowed through soil or stone, but actually constructing a tunnel is a challenge. Find out how tunnels are built.

How Crossbows Work

The crossbow, a weapon popular with Wookiees, vampire slayers and some modern hunters, looks like a cross between a bow and a rifle. Read about it’s fascinating history and uses.

How can someone control a machine with her thoughts?

The Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago introduced a new bionic arm that can be controlled by reading a person's thoughts. How does this technology work? Can you control a machine with thoughts? Learn about the bionic arm in this article.

How Real Transformers Work

Will we see robots with Transformers' capabilities during our lifetimes? Some existing robots have a lot in common with Transformers. Learn how.

How BrainPort Works

Learn all about BrainPort, a device for sensory substitution by electrotactile stimulation.

Wanted: One Well-dressed Android

A female Android designed to look like a 20-something Korean woman is capable of making facial expressions and holding a simple conversation.

How a Cold Heat Soldering Iron Works

As an invention, Cold Heat seems to have everything. But reviewers -- both professionals and average users -- either love the tool or hate it, and some people question whether it's really "new" at all.

How Biometrics Works

With the help of Q, James Bond can breeze through a security system that requires the villain's irises, voice and handprint. Biometrics isn't just for the movies. Real-life businesses and governments are using it. Check it out.

How Rail Guns Work

Rail guns leave gunpowder-based weapons in the dust (one can hit a target 250 miles away in six minutes). So why isn't the military using them? Find out how rail guns can be used and learn about the limitations of this technology.

What is a levee?

Whether they make you think of Hurricane Katrina or Led Zeppelin, levees are a critical safety feature for low-lying areas located near water. Why do they break?

I just saw a movie where the main character, a British secret agent, is revived after 30 years on ice. Are scientists actually working on this stuff?

I just saw a movie where the main character, a British secret agent has been "frozen." In the film, he is revived after 30 years on ice. My friend says scientists are actually working on this stuff. What's up with that?

How the World Trade Center Worked

The twin towers of the World Trade Center were true originals -- their history is one of innovation, persistence and grand ideas.

How CAT Scans Work

CAT scans take X-ray imaging to a whole new level. Find out how a CAT scan machine uses "slices" to form a 3-D computer model of a patient's insides.

How Robots Work

A robot and a human being are made up of the same basic components. And with each passing decade, robots become more lifelike. Find out how robots operate and how close we are to artificial intelligence.

How X-rays Work

X-ray machines seem to do the impossible: They see straight through clothing, flesh and even metal, thanks to some very cool scientific principles at work. Find out how X-ray machines see straight to your bones.

How Water Slides Work

It's a leap of faith onto a curvy steep wet chute... Discover how water slides work and what draws thrill-seekers to them.

How Wave Pools Work

When the heat sets in, there's nothing like a day at the water park to cool things down -- water parks and their massive wave pools are a huge weekend attraction. Ever wonder what kind of machinery it takes to produce a wave? Learn exactly how an oce

How Intelligent Highways Will Work

If you were on the road for the holidays, you probably spent some time staring at the bumper in front of you. Can you imagine a world without gridlock?

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