Storms

Storms are a meteorological event that can be studied to advance the science of meteorology. The study of storms can potentially save lives as scientists gain a better understanding of their nature. Learn more about storms here.


Scorching-high temps seem to be the norm this summer. So what does this kind of heat do to your body?

Tsunamis are triggered by earthquakes and volcanic eruptions on the ocean's floor. But other massive waves are caused by wind and can come on suddenly and without warning.

The mercury soared to over 122 degrees Fahrenheit in Nawkwabash, Pakistan. It could be the highest April temp ever recorded on the planet.

Scientists across the globe attempt to forecast upcoming hurricane seasons in the Atlantic. But how — and are they right?

In the mid-20th century, lightning strikes killed hundreds of Americans each year. Now, that number's dropped to only a few dozen. What's changed?

Hurricanes can range in strength from Category 1 all the way to Category 5. Learn more about hurricane categories in this HowStuffWorks Illustrated video.

Researchers studying tornadoes use a common theory of economics to determine casualty rates.

As Hurricane Matthew continues its deadly tour of the East Coast, HowStuffWorks Now explore all the ways these mega-storms can take you out.

Herd animals stick together, but when there's a lightning storm, there may not be safety in numbers.

El Nino is anything but child's play when it comes to affecting the globe's weather — and, in turn, our economies, health and safety.

Frogs! Fish! Birds! A surprising number of things have rained down from the sky besides water. But how?

Thunder in the winter is a pretty cool phenomenon. It's unexpected, plus some say when you hear it, snow will arrive within seven days. If you hear thunder during the winter, should you get your snow shovel ready?

You've always heard that lightning never strikes the same spot twice. So if that tree stump in the yard was struck during a storm, why not just go sit there during the next storm? You're safe, right? You might want to rethink that.

There's nothing quite as relaxing as a nice bubble bath at the end of the day. However, take one during a thunderstorm and you may have a shocking experience instead. Read on to find out the connection between water and storms.

To paraphrase the band Queen, thunder and lightning are very, very frightening. Especially when you're stuck in a car in the middle of nowhere. But can your rubber tires protect you from a lightning strike?

Ah, lightning. Nothing like millions of volts of electricity skittering around your neighborhood to get the old heart rate up and send you scrambling for cover. Of course, no one can stay hidden forever, so when's it safe to come out?

In the distance, storm clouds are gathering. The air feels alive — almost electric. Even the animals are getting restless. Yep, no doubt about it: a storm's brewin'. So should you stay and watch the light show, or should you take cover?

In the days of Ancient Greece, it was easy enough to chalk up a bolt from the blue to Zeus, the great curmudgeon of Mt. Olympus. But while Ancient Greeks probably never felt safe from their grumpy god, today we know a bit more about lightning safety.

Simon and Garfunkel. Peanut butter and jelly. Thunder and lightning. Some things are just better when they roll in pairs. But while we know that '60s folk singers and classic foodstuffs can also roll solo, what about these stormy BFFs?

If you're in a thunderstorm, then your top priority is safety. It might sound like a good idea to call your loved ones and let them know you're okay, but hold the phone a moment. See those lightning bolts outside? They've got other ideas.

It would be nice if our electronic devices doubled as handy, lightning-proof talismans to ward off danger during a thunderstorm. Sadly, that sounds more like sorcery than science. In the meantime, maybe you should just leave them off and unplugged.

There's a thunderstorm brewing with some serious lightning. Fortunately you're safe in your car because of its rubber wheels. Or are you? And let's not get started on your rubber-soled sneakers!

Next time the cat starts sneezing, should you look for your umbrella or check her out for allergies? There are many superstitions out there about animals and weather prediction. Which ones hold water, and which ones are for the birds?

There are certain steps you should take to protect yourself, your family and your home during a disaster. These are not those steps.

The most damaging hurricanes usually have female names. Is this a case of gender bias, or is some other force at work?