Forces of Nature

We see the destruction that the Earth can unleash in the news on a regular basis. Here you can learn about hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes and other forces of nature.


Is climate change to blame for king tides flooding coastal cities more often? Some scientists say yes.

California cannabis farmers could lose everything in the wildfires.

New research digs into historic volcano fatalities to explore how, where and whom a volcano is most likely to kill.

In the mid-20th century, lightning strikes killed hundreds of Americans each year. Now, that number's dropped to only a few dozen. What's changed?

When a major storm is barreling down, the reasons why some people choose to shelter in place are complicated.

Words matter when talking about those seeking shelter from the storm. What's the difference between hurricane evacuees and refugees?

Historic Hurricane Irma is being supercharged by the effects of climate change heating Earth's oceans.

'You really can't describe to anybody what it's like to sit through a hurricane,' says Ruth Clark, who lived through Hurricanes Camille and Katrina.

Hurricanes are the strongest storms on the planet. How we categorize them has helped save lives.

The four seasons experienced by Earth's midlatitude regions are being gradually altered by global warming — but a climate expert says they won't completely go away.

A new model describes in more detail how the Chicxulub asteroid affected our planet, from dropping temperatures to pausing photosynthesis, with soot playing an integral part.

Researchers studying tornadoes use a common theory of economics to determine casualty rates.

Very specific atmospheric conditions and just the right perspective are necessary to see the phenomenon.

Polar temperatures are changing more rapidly than equatorial ones, making the jet stream slower and wider, and extreme events longer-lasting.

Explosive solar events are bad news for Earth, so it's good to keep an eye on space weather. Newly discovered "Rossby-like" waves could help them out with that big job.

We've all seen shots of meteorologists fighting gale-force winds to report on storms. So just how high can the winds get before the reporters are knocked off their feet?

Earth's atmosphere used to be full of toxic hydrogen, but a brief period of methane smog cleared the way for valuable oxygen to set up shop.

Midwestern night owls got a meteoric surprise this week.

The atmosphere protects those of us here on land from cosmic radiation. So what about those who spend time above the clouds?

Researchers from Montreal's Concordia University have figured out why the air inside a tornado vortex is cooler and less dense than the surrounding air.

As Hurricane Matthew continues its deadly tour of the East Coast, HowStuffWorks Now explore all the ways these mega-storms can take you out.

What happens when two unpredictable storms show up to dance? And what about when one finally heads out to sea — then abruptly turns inland again for a one-two punch?

Weather bombs have produced some of the most destructive storms on record. So what is one exactly?

Herd animals stick together, but when there's a lightning storm, there may not be safety in numbers.

It's every evil mad scientist's dream. Could it ever be a reality?