Environmental Science

The environment is truly a thing of beauty and should be protected whenever possible. What can we do to save the environment, and what new technology is available to help us?

Antarctica is tough to get to. Tougher still, for a group of paleontologists, is not knowing what's under all that ice. This expedition looks to remedy that problem.

The formidable gusher could stop flowing for a few months in 2019 in order to repair some bridges in dire need.

The temporary installation joins the four bronze Barbary lion statues in London's Trafalgar Square; it highlights the rapid ongoing decline in worldwide lion population.

Underwater icicles, also called brinicles or sea stalactites, form when super-cold brine meets normal seawater. The sub-zero phenomenon can kill some sea life.

The JOIDES Resolution expedition launched in early December to drill into the Earth's mantle under the Indian Ocean and gain new geological and biological knowledge.

SeaOrbiter would allow scientists to live at sea, and could be the aquatic equivalent of the International Space Station – if it can get the $53 million needed to finish.

Creator envisions its use at the next big natural disaster.

Wouldn't it be nice if that decrepit old warehouse in your town finally found new life, as a farm?

This strange and elusive quasiparticle could help to solve a major problem with modern electronics: power loss.

Climate change should shape the infrastructure of the future, says one engineering expert. Here's how.

Can you keep ancient things you unearth? While the short answer is, yes, there are, of course, legal and ethical considerations depending on the circumstances.

Scientists are tickled pink about all the environmental uses for the orange peel.

Drones and other unmanned flying machines are going green.

Drones give farmers a fresh look at what's happening with their crops.

Tubeworms aren't antisocial; they just prefer an environment that's a little different from the rest of us — one that happens to be as hot as an oven and riddled with bacteria.

If you've ever been pulled underwater at the beach and came up sputtering with a mouthful of salt water, you might wonder where the ocean picked up that briny flavor. Read on to learn just where all that salt comes from.

There's no question that people are interested in solar energy. The problem has been how to store it. Could the much-hyped Powerwall home battery change that scenario?

Could the source of Earth's future energy come from an ambitious idea to encircle the sun with technology? Maybe, but it's a concept that's a long way from today's reality.

Introducing a new species into an ecosystem can have unforeseen and disastrous consequences for the species that already live there.

If you think about all the things that are removed from your drinking water, you'd be pretty thankful for public water systems. But they can't keep out everything.

There's still a lot we don't know about the world. A thousand years ago, we thought we could literally sail off the edge of the planet. Good thing we're quick learners. But while space may be the final frontier, the ocean may be the greater mystery.

There's no denying it: "Anomaly" is a great word, full of danger and mystery. So when an underwater object is declared a bona fide anomaly, it's no surprise our ears perk up a bit. But is the Baltic Sea anomaly worth the hype or just a big old dud?

Yes, we have way too much non-biodegradable plastic clogging up everything on this planet, but what if there was a way to make plastic out of something better or even more natural? Would shrimp shells work?

These days, it seems everyone is "going green." From individuals to businesses, everyone is looking for ways to be more sustainable and environmentally-friendly. But is green tech the way of the future or just another fad?

Decades of fossil discoveries have revealed much about the extinct members of our hominid family tree, but we're far from having all the answers. What have we learned from some of these fascinating finds?