Astronomy is a broad discipline covering all facets of astrophysics. In this section you can learn about the origins of the universe, black holes and other astronomical phenomena.

Galaxies got their start nearly 14 billion years ago, with one unimaginably hot, dense and tiny pinpoint. How did we arrive at the universe's sprawling state of galactic affairs today?

It's tough to wrap your mind around a time when the Earth wasn't here. So how do Earth and the rest of the planets out there get their start in the universe?

Long, long ago, our sun began its life as a mere twinkle in the universe's eye. How did it become the ruler of our solar system?

It's your home, and a colossally sized one at that. How much do you know about your galactic digs and their residence amid the yawning universe?

Scientists have discovered the existence of water on both our moon and on Mars. Both findings are significant, but what do they mean? Can we use this information to our advantage for space exploration?

The occasional sunspot can interrupt communications here on Earth. But major solar flares have the potential to cause more havoc. Could a flare-up wipe out all our electronics?

Sunspots are peculiar dark areas that show up regularly on the surface of the sun -- and often for no reason. What causes them? What effect could these funny little spots have on the Earth?

Aquarius, a constellation and the 11th sign of the zodiac. The name means "water bearer." Aquarius contains no particularly bright or noteworthy stars.

Aquila, a constellation visible from the Northern Hemisphere. The name means "eagle." The Great Rift of the Milky Way (a dark area in the bright band of stars) passes through Aquila.

Aries, a constellation and the first sign of the zodiac. The name means "The Ram." Aries is a small constellation that contains no noteworthy stars.

Auriga, a constellation in the northern celestial hemisphere. The name means "The Charioteer." Capella, the brightest star in Auriga, is the sixth brightest star in the night sky.

Dipper, Big and Little, two groups of stars of the northern part of the sky, so called because of their resemblance to the outline of water dippers.

Botes, a constellation seen in the evening skies between March and September. It rises in the northeast and sets in the northwest.

Although other planets have rings, none are as spectacular as Saturn's. What makes the planet's stratified rings, and how did they get there in the first place?

After Viking 1 captured images of what looked like a face on Mars, the public began to speculate. Had Martians carved a colossus, or was there another answer?

The only thing that's lurking in the shadows during a lunar eclipse is the moon. When Earth's shadow blocks sunlight from directly illuminating a full moon, you're witnessing a lunar eclipse.

If your idea of photographing the stars has nothing to do with Hollywood, you might be interested in astrophotography -- the sky's literally the limit.

Comets are some of the most stunning elements of space. These clumps of dust and ice feature amazing tails that can stretch for thousands of miles. This gallery showcases some examples of comets.

The changing phases of the moon have given us an enduring curiosity about the dark side of the moon. But is there really a dark side of the moon? What would we see there?

As every fledgling and seasoned astronomer knows, groups of stars that form some sort of arrangement are known as constellations. Peer at some of the most famous constellations that humans use to navigate, divine the future and tell stories.

Radio telescopes can give us some impressive insights into the universe. This collection of pictures highlights some of the images these telescopes have captured.

Some of the most amazing star making regions in space are highlighted in this collection of nebula pictures. Check out some stunning pictures nebulae in this gallery.

Until recently, most people assumed that if Mars had liquid water, it no longer did and hadn't for quite some time. But scientists have recently noticed some anomalies in photos of Mars that may suggest there is water. Could there be life, too?

You've probably heard that staring at the sun is bad — even a few seconds can damage your eyes. But what if you looked at a solar eclipse?

Asteroid belts aren't quite the dense fields of gigantic spinning rocks that you may have seen in a "Star Wars" film, but they're still fascinating. In fact, the main asteroid belt may tell us how our entire solar system came into existence.