Space

Explore the vast reaches of space and mankind’s continuing efforts to conquer the stars, including theories such as the Big Bang, the International Space Station, plus what the future holds for space travel and exploration.

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In the vast night sky, where countless stars vie for attention, one colossus reigns supreme as the largest star in the universe. Situated thousands of light-years from Earth, this celestial giant's sheer magnitude challenges our understanding of stellar physics.

By Clarissa Mitton

The harvest moon is the full moon closest to the autumnal equinox, typically in late September or early October in the Northern Hemisphere.

By Nicole Antonio

Unlock the mysteries of Mercury Retrograde, its impact on astrology, and how to navigate its cosmic waves for personal growth.

By HowStuffWorks

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Delve into the Earth's layers: crust, mantle, outer core, and inner core. Discover the secrets beneath our feet and the dynamic processes at play.

By HowStuffWorks

Explore the mysteries of the outer planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. Dive deep into their atmospheres, moons, and unique phenomena.

By HowStuffWorks

Nothing lasts forever. Does that include our home planet, too?

By Shichun Huang

Sometimes hundreds of people armed with high-tech cameras can make amazing scientific discoveries, as in the case of STEVE.

By Jesslyn Shields

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March's full moon is called the worm moon for an unusual reason. What are some other names for the March moon and when can you see it?

By Valerie Stimac

Every 24 hours, Earth makes a full rotation on its axis. But why does Earth spin in the first place?

By Silas Laycock

Researchers at Australian National University studied 5,000 star-eating behemoths to find out.

By Christian Wolf

January's moon is called the wolf moon, but it's also known as the center moon and the freeze up moon (among other names). Here's why.

By Valerie Stimac

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Is it possible that we are not alone in the universe, but are just like animals in a zoo to the aliens who are watching us?

By Robert Lamb

Stars are giant nuclear fusion reactors, and we wouldn't exist without them. Find out how much you know about these twinkling lights with our quiz.

By David Warmflash, M.D.

All of the planets in the solar system are named for Greek gods, except Earth. So where did the name come from?

By Mark Mancini

He stood just 5 feet, 2 inches. But Gagarin cast an enormously long shadow in space exploration, both for his achievements and his mysterious death.

By Nathan Chandler

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We’re celebrating the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11’s historic journey to the moon.

It's been more than 50 years since humans first landed on the moon. Pull up a lunar module and let's see how much you know about Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, Michael Collins and the adventure that immortalized them.

By Mark Mancini

Why do planets in the solar system all seem to be round? Why not cylindrical? Or even cube-shaped?

By Mark Mancini

So what does that mean for good ol' Earth someday?

By Ian O'Neill, Ph.D.

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In the darkness of space, we’re comforted by our moon, the circular inspirer of song lyrics, poetry, and wannabe astronauts. But what do you really know about the moon and its history? Take this quiz to find out.

By Nathan Chandler

Those stars twinkling in the nighttime sky may actually be crystal spheres. And our beloved star is headed in that direction, too. Eventually.

By Ian O'Neill, Ph.D.

If you think about it, it'll likely be an alien machine that encounters our probes searching for intelligent life. How's that going to work?

By Greg Fish

And while we're at it, why don't the other planets in our solar system seem to twinkle?

By Mark Mancini

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You could be reading this article deep in a dark matter rainforest filled with creatures in a roaring dark matter ecosystem — but have no clue.

By Ian O'Neill, Ph.D.

A massive planet 10 times the size of Earth seems to have been lurking on the edge of our solar system for some time now. How come we never noticed it before?

By Patrick J. Kiger