Green Science

Green Science is the application of eco-friendly thinking to scientific disciplines. Learn about global warming, pollution and other impacts on nature and the planet, plus what we can do to combat them.

Learn More / Page 5

As the world deals with a global food crisis, farmers need to figure out how to grow crops in a clean and sustainable way. What does sustainable agriculture accomplish that conventional farming can't?

By Dave Roos

The world's forests hold some of its most precious natural resources -- its trees. Sustainable forestry encourages attention to the forests' long-term health so they retain their value.

By Ed Grabianowski

In the race to find alternative energy sources, wind power is a strong contender. In fact, it's already making its mark. How much do you know about this up-and-coming energy source?

By Lance Looper

Advertisement

Not only do cars produce a large portion of the world's pollution, but airplanes, boats, trucks, trains and buses also contribute to pollution. Is there one magic solution to pollution?

By Eric Baxter

That's the goal for these minuscule technologies with their array of seemingly miraculous materials, supernatural conductivity and paranormal photonics. Can you name one?

By Nicholas Gerbis

While the specifics vary from one industry to the next, there are several generally accepted principles of green engineering that are universal. How much do you know about the discipline of green engineering?

By Akweli Parker

Most scientists agree that man-made climate change is a real phenomenon, but most people respond to their dire warnings by figuratively sticking their heads in the sand. Could the problem lie in the severity of their message? In other words, are we scaring people into inaction?

By Josh Clark

Advertisement

This green science image gallery shows eco-friendly applications as they apply to scientific disciplines. Take a look at these green science pictures.

Most scientists agree that human interference in the environment has something to do with the recent trend of rising temperatures on the Earth. If we got ourselves in this pickle, what can we do about it?

By Jonathan Strickland

Though not everyone agrees why the Earth is getting warmer, temperatures are inching up worldwide. A couple of degrees doesn't seem like such a big deal. What difference can a subtle change make?

By Jonathan Strickland

Recycling proponents tell us that everything that can be recycled should be. Some items, however, can use more energy to recycle than it would cost to make new ones. Are we better off throwing some things away?

By Jonathan Strickland

Advertisement

The U.N. World Food Programme says more than 1 billion people don't get enough to eat every day. Are crops genetically modified to generate better yields the answer to the world's hunger problems?

By Jonathan Strickland

If we all paused to look around before beginning to read this article, chances are our eyes would land on plastic. Or our hands would be resting on it as we glanced around. Will anything ever take the place of plastic?

By Robert Lamb

The mighty Romans certainly never thought it would happen to them, but the sun eventually sets on even the most powerful empires. Is there more to the story than war?

By Robert Lamb

Relief wells made the news as a possible method to cut off the Gulf Coast oil leak, but that's not all they're used for. How do these wells prevent and stop dangerous overflows?

By Laurie L. Dove

Advertisement

Landfills around the world are overflowing with the refuse of daily life. Can we shrink our trash heaps by means other than composting or recycling?

By Julia Layton

Ocean waste like this discarded net often works its way across thousands of miles, photodegrading and ultimately converging into a swirling vortex big by any standards. Is it possible to clean up the world's biggest landfill?

By Julia Layton

The ozone layer prevents much of the sun's ultraviolet light from reaching the Earth. But there's a problem: a gaping hole the size of Antarctica. What can we do about it?

By Tracy V. Wilson & Julia Layton

Biodynamic viticulture can get downright spiritual with its attention to lunar cycles and other cosmic forces. So why would a vineyard need to pay attention to such things, and what do manure-filled horns have to do with it?

By Jessika Toothman

Advertisement

Artificial light lets us stay up through the night or feel secure in the dark. But those midnight noons push our bodies out of whack and confuse the natural world. Is there a fix for light pollution?

By Jessika Toothman

Good solutions for congestion are hard to come by. But by using the principles of supply and demand, variable congestion pricing might just be able to clear things up.

By Julia Layton

Net metering could turn your home power setup into a money maker -- that is, if your state allows it. How can you start charging the electrical grid?

By Stephanie Watson

It's the largest machine in the world. Yet despite the sheer size of the U.S. power grid, a few outages can cost Americans at least $150 billion dollars annually. What are we to do? Could the smart grid be the answer?

By Robert Lamb

Advertisement

We're currently suspended between two ages: a time dependent on fossil fuels and a future dominated by renewable energy sources. Yet not everyone is sold on this vision, so a number of myths about renewable energy persist.

By Robert Lamb

They may seem like a fun water sport or a noisy nuisance, but whatever your stance on personal watercraft, there's no denying they pollute. So how bad are they?

By Julia Layton