Physical Science

Physical science is the study of the physical world around you. Learn about everything from electricity to magnetism in this section.

Learn More / Page 4

Sir Michael Atiyah says he has proven the Riemann Hypothesis, one of the long-unsolved problems in mathematics.

By Patrick J. Kiger

Something very strange is afoot above the frozen landscape of Antarctica.

By Ian O'Neill, Ph.D.

Forensic linguists may never get their own TV show, but these scientists do help solve crimes in their own way.

By John Donovan

Advertisement

We caught up with everyone's favorite boson to see what it's been up to and exactly how it decays.

By Ian O'Neill, Ph.D.

CERN researchers have successfully tested a new way of accelerating electrons to high energies through proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration.

By Patrick J. Kiger

You probably have a bottle of the stuff at your house. Have you ever seen it come in any color bottle besides brown?

By John Perritano

The Trump administration quietly changed the rules on asbestos use in the U.S. What does that mean?

By John Donovan

Advertisement

Spanish researchers recently uncovered a new geometric shape that allows human tissue to curve. But how?

By Robert Lamb

You've heard of Google, but what about a Googol? If not, then this tutorial is for you.

By Mark Mancini

Scientists have developed a blood test that can give an approximate age of a person within an hour.

By Alia Hoyt

Scientists are using 3-D printers to make human corneas, an advancement that could end the perennial shortage of corneas from donors.

By Laurie L. Dove

Advertisement

Our fingerprints serve to definitively identify us forever, right? But do they? How long do fingerprints remain usable as identification after we are dead?

By Patrick J. Kiger

Does your brain start to cramp at the thought of having to do math? Experts explain why some people have math anxiety and how they can overcome it.

By Dave Roos

Anti-aging scientist Aubrey de Grey, who does math problems for relaxation, just made major progress on the daunting Hadwiger-Nelson problem.

By Patrick J. Kiger

Scientists have a new lead on what gives some animals the ability to sense Earth's magnetic field.

By Jesslyn Shields

Advertisement

Listen in as the guys from Stuff They Don't Want You to Know investigate the sonic weapons "attack" in Cuba.

By Diana Brown

English mathematician Benjamin Gompertz formulated the first natural law of the way we die.

By Jesslyn Shields

The flick, the shake and the micromort are just three of the unusual measurements that scientists use.

By Dave Roos

The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor plant aims to demonstrate that nuclear fusion could be a viable source of power in the future.

By Patrick J. Kiger

Advertisement

It's a force of habit to shake spray canisters, but when it comes to canned air, that inclination could cause frostbite.

By Laurie L. Dove

Nights on Earth are getting artificially brighter, bringing unintended consequences.

By Patrick J. Kiger

Why do we love looking at a perfectly stacked display of soup cans or six flower petals around a stamen? Our brains seem wired for it -- but why?

By Dave Roos

A new analysis of the ancient Indian Bakhshali manuscript suggests the numerical symbol zero, as we use it today, may be centuries older than previously believed.

By Patrick J. Kiger

Advertisement

Scientists have figured out why some objects stick more to each other. And it's a very cool trick.

By Alia Hoyt

If you're one of those people who chooses invisibility as your desired superpower, it could mean you have a dark side.

By Alia Hoyt