Math Concepts

Math is often called the universal language because no matter where you're from, a better understanding of math means a better understanding of the world around you. Learn about math concepts such as addition, subtraction, fractions, ratios and more.

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You've probably seen supplementary angles examples in your everyday life without knowing it. Whether you pass a leaning sign on a flat highway or walk by a shed with a lean-to roof — whenever two angles combine to form a straight, linear pair, there they are.

By Mitch Ryan

Mathematicians use something called interval notation to convey information about a range of values in a way that's clear and easy to understand. This form of writing is necessary because intervals are common concepts in calculus, algebra and statistics.

By Marie Look

Fundamental trigonometric identities, aka trig identities or trigo identities, are equations involving trigonometric functions that hold true for any value you substitute into their variables.

By Marie Look

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Algebra is the branch of mathematics that focuses on formulas, and one of its key concepts is the representation of linear equations, which describe straight lines.

By Marie Look

Whether you're studying up for a math test, helping your child with homework or just trying to brush up before trivia night, learning the basic ins and outs of polygons will serve you well.

By Mitch Ryan

A rhombus is a parallelogram shape with two pairs of parallel sides and four equal sides. These four sides of equal length also define the rhombus as an equilateral quadrilateral. Etymologically, the name of this shape stems from the Greek word "rhombos," which roughly translates to "spinning top."

By Mitch Ryan

Greater than, less than, equal to: These terms are mathematical expressions that allow the user to compare two numbers or equations. Once you've become familiar with these terms — and the symbols used to represent them — you'll be able to apply them to various math problems.

By Zach Taras

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As you might recall from math class, fractions and decimals are two different ways of representing the same thing. A third option, percentages, is a close cousin of decimals. However, making use of this knowledge requires knowing how to convert one into the other.

By Zach Taras

A number line is a pictorial representation of real numbers. It is most commonly used in elementary math classes to help students compare numbers and perform arithmetic operations like addition, subtraction, division and multiplication.

By Mitch Ryan

Mean, median, mode and sometimes range, are all different methods for finding probability distribution in statistics. Range can be a helpful yardstick when calculating data values that are close together, but it can quickly become confusing if there is a wide gap between the smallest value and the largest number.

By Mitch Ryan

As a child, when trying to come up with the biggest number possible, you might have said "infinity plus one." While technically infinity is the largest number because you cannot run out of numbers, the biggest numbers that we know of are still difficult to count but a bit more quantifiable.

By Yara Simón

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Do you need to calculate the rate at which something changes over time? Whether it's the change in the x-value over the change in the y-value of a line on a graph, or the distance travelled by a car over the course of an hour-long drive, you'll need a rate of change formula.

By Sascha Bos

Physicists use the displacement formula to find an object's change in position. It sounds simple, but calculating displacement can quickly get complicated.

By Sascha Bos

Frequency is a fundamental concept when you're talking about waves, whether that means electromagnetic waves like radio waves and visible light, or mechanical vibrations like sound waves.

By Marie Look

The wavelength formula is a fundamental concept in physics, particularly in the study of waves and electromagnetic radiation.

By Yara Simón

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In math, few skills are as practical as knowing how to do long division. It's the art of breaking down complex problems into manageable steps, making it an essential tool for students and adults alike.

By Desiree Bowie

We get it: You need help with the parabola equation because those graphs won't draw themselves. Here's how to draw a parabola from an equation.

By Yara Simón

Trying to figure out whether your research problem would benefit from qualitative vs. quantitative data? Learn about the differences and uses of each.

By Yara Simón

Distinguishing between discrete vs. continuous data and situations that call for each data type is important in ensuring you get your desired results.

By Marie Look

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Whether you're a math whiz or not, there are some pretty cool number theories, beliefs and coincidences to appreciate. How down with digits are you?

By Alia Hoyt

The scutoid is kind of like the Higgs boson. Researchers theorized the new shape existed. And then they went looking for it.

We'll show you both a quick and dirty way, and a precise, more complicated formula for converting Celsius to Fahrenheit (and vice versa).

By Sydney Murphy & Austin Henderson

Many people get speed and velocity confused. It's no surprise because the terms are often used interchangeably. But they're not quite the same thing. So how do you find the velocity of an object?

By Mark Mancini

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Sir Isaac Newton's Law of Universal Gravitation helps put the laws of gravity into a mathematical formula. And the gravitational constant is the "G" in that formula.

By Mark Mancini

Both degrees and radians represent the measure of an angle in geometry. So, how do you convert one to the other?

By Mark Mancini