Science Questions

Science questions are a fun and interesting way to learn about planet Earth, organisms and the universe. In this section you'll find an incredible collection of science questions covering a wide variety of topics.

Learn More

Humans routinely break the sound barrier in supersonic aircraft. Could everyone's favorite hedgehog do it, too?

By Robert Lamb

The blog Retraction Watch released an online database of more than 18,000 papers and conference materials that have been retracted since the 1970s.

By Oisin Curran

From the latest on the future of license plates to the history of ketchup, catch up on some of our best stories of the week here.

By Alexis Robinson

Advertisement

From the latest news on tracking apps to ghost lights, catch up on some of our best stories of the week here.

By Alexis Robinson

From a Frankensteinian future to what it means to be unladylike in 2018, catch up on some of our best stories of the week here.

By Alexis Robinson

From the latest on the risks of holding in a sneeze to engineering toys for girls, catch up on some of our best stories of the week here.

By Alexis Robinson

'The Flintstones' to the Darien Gap, catch up on some of our best stories of the week here.

By Alexis Robinson

Advertisement

From the latest on UFOs to 'The Last Jedi,' catch up on some of our best stories of the week here.

By Alexis Robinson

Although spending time upside down can be good for overall health, doing so eventually can be fatal under the right conditions.

By Jesslyn Shields

What's the likelihood we're living in 'The Matrix'? A new study suggests it's pretty likely we're real after all.

By Patrick J. Kiger

The silliest, strangest and saddest stories of the week, including the gloomy octopus, caring for sick pets and those who go missing from national parks

By Sarah Gleim

Advertisement

From stories on edible packaging to sheltering in place during a natural disaster, here are our best podcasts and articles of the week.

By Yves Jeffcoat

Ancient Babylonian trigonometry, a mysterious, unidentified corpse and chakrams all make an appearance in this week's roundup of our podcasts and articles.

By Yves Jeffcoat

In this week's roundup of HowStuffWorks podcasts and articles, a neurological disorder causes an addiction to joking, and slug mucus inspires surprisingly strong glue for biological tissues.

By Yves Jeffcoat

Advertisement

This week, we bring you stories on the fascinating history of women and whiskey, frogs' debt to dinos and odd U.S. presidential habits. Read on!

By Yves Jeffcoat

Check out stories about paid protesters, brain hacking and the insane amount of U.S. food waste in this week's roundup of articles and podcasts.

By Yves Jeffcoat

Check out a compilation of the coolest new podcasts and articles at HowStuffWorks, featuring barbers who use fire as clippers and a venomous mammalian ancestor.

By Yves Jeffcoat

President Donald Trump has proposed cutting the agency's Earth science budget. But doing so could negatively impact construction, farming and infrastructure projects.

By Patrick J. Kiger

Advertisement

We're close to slaying Guinea worm in humans, only now it's arisen in dogs. The team also has news on humpbacks and on how personality and musical taste are intertwined.

By Allison Loudermilk

The practice of clapping to show our approval is an ancient one. But recent research suggests that applause actually spreads like a contagious disease.

By Patrick J. Kiger

Very often, media coverage of scientific studies is misleading or just plain wrong. What do scientists think would make it better?

By Alia Hoyt

College students who volunteer to participate in academic experiments for extra credit don't exactly represent humanity. And that's a problem for research.

By Julia Layton

Advertisement

In 1915, the great physicist predicted the existence of ripples in space-time called gravitational waves. A century later, scientists finally have detected them on Earth.

By Patrick J. Kiger

The genetic material from two parents combines to form a child. Can we throw a third set of genes into the mix?

By Patrick J. Kiger