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Life Science

From the smallest microbe to the largest mammal, Life Science explores the origins, evolution and expansion of life in all its forms. Explore a wide range of topics from biology to genetics and evolution.

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Where's the Line Between Fandom and Obsession?

Rabid fans may seem crazy, but there can be good reasons why they go all out for their favorite celebrity, sport or TV show.

Pretending to Be Batman Helps Kids Focus on Boring Tasks, Study Shows

The Batman Effect, as researchers have dubbed it, allows little ones to separate themselves from temptation and stay on task.

Cancer Scientists Sniff Out the Genes Behind Durian's Famous Stink

Mapping the genome of the King of Fruits reveals the source of its smell, and may present opportunities to develop pharmaceuticals.

10 Types of Study Bias

We often think that if a drug has been studied by scientists and given a favorable outcome, then it must be safe and proven. But many kinds of biases can creep into a study, rendering it less than effective.

Sorry, Not Sorry: When Apologizing Makes Things Worse

A series of studies showed that including the word 'sorry' in a rejection actually made the rejected person feel worse.

Intricate Ice Caves in Antarctica May Harbor Unique Life

On the surface, Antarctica may seem like a barren landscape. But underneath, in massive ice caves, life may be abundant.

10 Things Lefties Do Better

Although left-handed people were thought to be "sinister" or "unnatural" in previous eras, we now know that left-handedness is natural for 10 percent of the population. And it can have some advantages over right-handedness too.

Commercial Ancestry Tests Can Reveal How Much Neanderthal DNA You Have

At least two commercial DNA testing services offer users information on heritage coming from coupling between ancient humans and other species.

DNA Researchers Call on Bone Hoarders to Share Bone Access

A recent letter in the journal Nature claims that access to ancient human remains should be more open, especially in light of advancements in analysis techniques.

Could Gut Bacteria Become the Next Sports Drink?

The mass of microorganisms swarming inside your favorite elite athlete's body may be a great business opportunity.

Which Countries Have the Smallest Personal Space?

An extensive study looks at personal space in 42 countries, and how weather affects preferences.

Surprisingly Swift Evolution Observed in Lizard Species

Over the course of one frigid winter, green anole lizards in Texas changed up their genetic makeup to help them better tolerate cold.

Why Do People Usually Walk In the Same Direction?

Do we have a tendency to walk clockwise around the block? Why do sports favor counterclockwise rotation? Does it have anything to do with handedness or driving habits?

Artifacts Suggest Human Arrival in Australia 18,000 Years Earlier Than Thought

Researchers have deduced that Homo sapiens reached Australia 65,000 years ago, extending our presence Down Under by 10,000 years.

Forgetting Isn't Always Bad — It Helps Us Make Better Decisions

Forgetfulness may seem like an undesirable trait, but new research shows that memory loss is an essential brain function that can make us smarter.

Do Large Undiscovered Species Still Exist?

What are the chances there are still large, undiscovered animals on the planet? More likely than you might think.

Can 'Parentese' Help Babies From Monolingual Families Learn New Languages?

Baby brains benefit from a second language. A new strategy shows how one hour of daily play in "parentese" helps babies pick up new language capabilities.

Plants Can Defend Themselves by Making Caterpillars Turn Cannibal

An interesting defense mechanism recently observed in tomato plants has caterpillars turning on themselves rather than remaining vegetarian.

Dinosaur Extinction Allowed Frogs to Flourish

Frogs owe a debt to that giant asteroid, a new study finds, opening up evolutionary options previously blocked by dinos.

These Pine Trees Almost Always Lean Toward the Equator

Cook pines are known to be a little tipsy. But a group of researchers just discovered that the trees' tilt isn't random — no matter their location on the globe, they lean toward the equator.

Family Tree of Homo Sapiens Continues to Evolve

Were hobbits and giants real? And are they distant relatives of humans?

Oldest Homo Sapiens Fossils Ever Found Suggest a Human Evolution Rewrite

Remains in Morocco push back Homo sapiens origins at least 100,000 years — and show that our species evolved neither in the way nor place we've assumed.

Too Much Charisma Can Actually Hurt a Leader's Effectiveness

A new study reveals that anything more than a moderate amount of charisma in a leader actually may interfere with his or her effectiveness.

Scientists Control Cells With Light, Make Cool Artwork

But the artwork is just the beginning of how scientists hope to boss around engineered bacteria.

Swearing Makes You Stronger, Study Finds

Yes, there might be another reason we reach for expletives when we're under stress.

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