Cellular & Microscopic Biology

Cellular and microscopic biology allow scientists to study cells and microorganisms. Cellular biology is the study of cells, including their structure and function. Microbiology is the study of microorganisms, which include algae, bacteria, and viruses.

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We've known for while that our microbiomes affect our health, but new research suggest their circadian rhythms are tightly interconnected with ours.

By Jesslyn Shields

A new study conducted on mice found a change in anxiety and aggression, and that probiotics could mediate any changes.

By Jesslyn Shields

New studies suggests your gait may be able to predict something deeper than just a temporary mood.

By Jesslyn Shields

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It's all connected! Recent rodent research suggests that immune responses and social behavior may be more intertwined than we realized.

By Julia Layton

With 51 days and counting until the Olympics, Rio's busy dealing with yet another crisis: the presence of super bacteria at many of the Olympic swimming holes.

By Kate Kershner

Trees? Fungus? Bacteria? It all kind of depends on how you define "alive" ... and how you define "thing," as this BrainStuff video explains.

By Laurie L. Dove

Citizen scientists collected bacteria strains to send to the International Space Station. All grew exactly the same as on Earth — except for one, which grew much faster.

By Laurie L. Dove

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Giant viruses sound like something from a science fiction movie. But they're real. However, they're not as scary as you might think.

By Alia Hoyt

Viruses, viroids and prions are microscopic, infectious particles with a common, despicable goal — but the way each goes about achieving that goal is different.

By Debra Ronca

Deep in Siberia, scientists discovered a giant, amoeba-eating virus. This may sound like straight-up sci-fi, but it's actually happened a few times. Is climate change to blame for resurrecting these ancient bugs?

By Karen Kirkpatrick

Both can make you feel lousy, but there are a few important differences between the causes of bacterial and viral infections – knowing the details can help improve your health.

By Debbie Swanson

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A post-antibiotic world is a scary thought. Without antibiotics to cure our infections, a public health crisis is inevitable. In the absence of new drugs, is it possible to reserve the resistance of those bacteria?

By Patrick J. Kiger

Bacteria are both friend and foe to humanity. They cause and cure health problems, make rotting food stink and give sourdough its delicious taste. Find out how these countless tiny microbes accomplish all of this and more.

By Marianne Spoon

Spend your life on your smartphone and you may be sending yourself to the sick bed. Here's a list of some of the nasty germs that could be lurking on your mobile device.

By Chris Opfer

That bully who tormented you in school might not seem to have changed much when he put you down at the 10-year reunion. But he's practically a whole new person.

By Chris Opfer

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You like to think of yourself as an individual. But the truth is there's a huge microbial party going inside and outside your body right now. And the folks from the Human Microbiome Project want to know what those microbes are up to.

By Kate Kershner

Worried that we're running out of effective antibiotics? Never fear. Scientists are plundering cockroach brains and other surprising sources to create new lifesaving medications.

By Patrick J. Kiger

Lots of Americans believe that getting the flu is no worse than getting a cold. Or that the flu vaccine can give them flu. We separate truth from fiction.

By Patrick J. Kiger

While HeLa cells have been star players in medical research for decades, the woman behind them remained in the shadows for years. Discover the amazing story of Henrietta Lacks and her immortal cells in this article.

By Shanna Freeman

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Molecular biology isn't all fun and games -- except when it is. How did a bunch of gamers handily solve a decade-old problem in three weeks flat?

By Nicholas Gerbis

You won't find some of history's biggest killers on this list, but you will find at least one disease that will make you want to bite something and another that might make you break out in "elevated pustules." Curious yet?

By Garth Sundem

Pasteurization is the process of removing harmful pathogens from various types of food. How was this process discovered?

By Carol White

Biofilms form when single microorganisms attach to a hydrated surface and undergo a "lifestyle switch." But why should we care about biofilms?

By Marianne Spoon

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Cell suicide sounds unpleasant, but this programmed cell death is the reason your fingers and toes are no longer webbed. What's the story behind apoptosis, and what does it have to do with curing disease?

By Molly Edmonds

Phone calls, e-mails, sign language, friendly shouts -- this is how we communicate in our daily lives. Bacteria, some of the tiniest organisms on Earth, have a different way of talking.

By Molly Edmonds