Space

Explore the vast reaches of space and mankind’s continuing efforts to conquer the stars, including theories such as the Big Bang, the International Space Station, plus what the future holds for space travel and exploration.

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The image, which was created by the European Space Agency, shows the blazing hot orb's northern-most region for the very first time. Pretty cool stuff.

By Mark Mancini

That means it takes nearly 17 hours for a radio signal, traveling at the speed of light from Earth, to reach Voyager 2.

By Ian O'Neill, Ph.D.

We've identified 11 different times gravitational waves have passed through Earth. Yep, we're getting good at detecting these ripples in spacetime that Einstein predicted.

By Ian O'Neill, Ph.D.

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After cruising 300 million miles and spending seven months in space, the InSight spacecraft successfully touched down on Mars' surface. How awesome is that?

By Ian O'Neill, Ph.D.

And this hot DOG's ferocious appetite shows no signs of slowing down.

By Ian O'Neill, Ph.D.

Dark matter is the most mysterious (and possibly important) material in the universe, and scientists are excited that a storm of the stuff is upon us.

By Jesslyn Shields

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But you can forget about Barnard's Star b bearing any resemblance to our planet.

By Ian O'Neill, Ph.D.

If you think about it, it'll likely be an alien machine that encounters our probes searching for intelligent life. How's that going to work?

By Greg Fish

A stunning accusation has been made: About 10 billion years ago, a small galaxy strayed too close to ours, so our galaxy ate it.

By Ian O'Neill, Ph.D.

The idea behind the "fake" moon is to provide extra illumination to Chengdu, a city in China's Sichuan province. What could possibly go wrong?

By Mark Mancini

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Can a moon have a moon of its own?

By Patrick J. Kiger

With the Russian Soyuz spacecraft officially out of commission, what does that mean for space exploration? And more importantly, the crew on the International Space Station?

By Mark Mancini

Back in 2006, the International Astronomical Union decided to demote Pluto to the status of a dwarf planet. A historical study challenges that designation.

By Patrick J. Kiger

When most people think of NASA, they probably think of astronauts and the Kennedy Space Center. But there's a whole lot more to this 60-year-old organization.

By Craig Freudenrich, Ph.D. & Patrick J. Kiger

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Anders' Earthrise and 8 Homeward are the two moon craters recently named in honor of the 1968 Apollo 8 mission, the first NASA mission to orbit the moon.

By Patrick J. Kiger

It's a small world with an astonishingly long orbit around our sun. And it could lead us to the fabled Planet X.

By Ian O'Neill, Ph.D.

It dashed through our solar system like a cigar-shaped signal from another star system. But which one? Astronomers are on the case.

By Ian O'Neill, Ph.D.

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A Japanese billionaire art collector is the lucky ticket holder and he plans to invite a few artists to tag along — for free.

By Mark Mancini

This stellar noodle is the strongest material in the cosmos!

By Ian O'Neill, Ph.D.

Maybe there aren't more dimensions beyond the four that we know and love so well.

By Ian O'Neill, Ph.D.

Jupiter has been notoriously bad about revealing any water deep in its thick atmosphere. That's changing though.

By Ian O'Neill, Ph.D.

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Comet 21P and comet 46P will swing past our planet during the month of September — and you won't need a telescope to see either.

By Mark Mancini

Visionaries have proposed various ways to get into space without using large rockets for propulsion, such as building a space elevator or harnessing magnetic levitation.

By Patrick J. Kiger