Innovation

Do you know how common everyday items, such as mirrors, fireworks or sunglasses work? This collection of Innovation articles explores the workings of objects you may come into contact with on a regular basis.

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A startup in California is touting the anti-aging effects of transfusing teenagers' blood on older people.

By Diana Brown

From the latest on the future of license plates to the history of ketchup, catch up on some of our best stories of the week here.

By Alexis Robinson

Why are we still performing scientific tests on live animals?

By Patrick J. Kiger

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Dimethylpolysiloxane has many uses, not the least of which might be curing baldness.

By Jesslyn Shields

From the latest news on tracking apps to ghost lights, catch up on some of our best stories of the week here.

By Alexis Robinson

From a Frankensteinian future to what it means to be unladylike in 2018, catch up on some of our best stories of the week here.

By Alexis Robinson

We might not be able to reanimate a corpse, but Mary Shelley's 'Frankenstein' has influenced the research and ethics of scientists for 200 years.

By Jesslyn Shields

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From the latest on the risks of holding in a sneeze to engineering toys for girls, catch up on some of our best stories of the week here.

By Alexis Robinson

'The Flintstones' to the Darien Gap, catch up on some of our best stories of the week here.

By Alexis Robinson

From the latest on UFOs to 'The Last Jedi,' catch up on some of our best stories of the week here.

By Alexis Robinson

Although spending time upside down can be good for overall health, doing so eventually can be fatal under the right conditions.

By Jesslyn Shields

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What's the likelihood we're living in 'The Matrix'? A new study suggests it's pretty likely we're real after all.

By Patrick J. Kiger

A beta test of the online game "ArcheAge" revealed that people may be more helpful than harmful when an apocalypse looms.

By Shelley Danzy

The silliest, strangest and saddest stories of the week, including the gloomy octopus, caring for sick pets and those who go missing from national parks

By Sarah Gleim

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HowStuffWorks explains the secrets of static electricity.

Alvarez won the Nobel Prize for his work in particle physics. But he also created a detonator for atomic bombs, and even thought the U.S. should make a hydrogen bomb.

By Kate Kershner

Read on to catch up on some of our latest podcasts and articles.

By Yves Jeffcoat

From stories on edible packaging to sheltering in place during a natural disaster, here are our best podcasts and articles of the week.

By Yves Jeffcoat

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Neanderthals distilled tar more than 100,000 years before modern humans created glue; archaeologists compared three potential ways this ancient tech was used.

By Jesslyn Shields

Ancient Babylonian trigonometry, a mysterious, unidentified corpse and chakrams all make an appearance in this week's roundup of our podcasts and articles.

By Yves Jeffcoat

You're going to be looking at the sky anyway, so why not use a citizen-science smartphone app to help NASA while you're at it?

By Jesslyn Shields

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In this week's roundup of HowStuffWorks podcasts and articles, a neurological disorder causes an addiction to joking, and slug mucus inspires surprisingly strong glue for biological tissues.

By Yves Jeffcoat

It's not quite a robot butler, but two companies hope their real-life appliances will cross one tedious laundry chore off your list.

By Laurie L. Dove