Military

Explore the weapons and combat systems used by the armed services. A broad range of topics in the Military Channel includes tanks, aircraft, biological warfare and stealth technologies.

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John F. Kennedy called the green beret "a symbol of excellence, a badge of courage, a mark of distinction in the fight for freedom" -- a nod to the most formidable arm of the U.S. military. The Green Berets, or Special Forces, are America's first line of defense around the world.

By Josh Clark

Delta Force is the U.S. military's most elite tactical combat group. Yet the government refuses to deny its existence. Does a well-funded secret force that, allegedly, answers only to the president make the U.S. more secure or more vulnerable?

By Josh Clark & Sascha Bos

Why the skies aren't exactly so friendly for drone pilots.

By Chris Opfer

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Military types are looking to drones to fly the deadly skies.

By Chris Opfer

If you're traveling during the winter time, there's a good chance that your flight may be delayed because the plane needs deicing. Why do they wait until the last minute to do this?

By Karen Kirkpatrick

We know how drone strikes are supposed to work: After careful monitoring, the bad guy is targeted and taken out. The reality is often much hazier — and deadlier.

By Clint Pumphrey

High-profile shootings often make people wonder if the victim or victims would still be alive if no guns had been available. But is that true? Are people more reckless simply because they have a gun?

By Becky Striepe

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From constructing bridges to blowing them up, combat engineers must have a head for spatial thinking and a heart that isn't faint. Ready to learn about these military enlistees who are as much action as they are equation?

By Kate Kershner

We're not talking about one of those laughable get-ups that celebs don when they want to go incognito for a latte. Nope, we're talking elaborate disguises -- from operatic to scientific.

By William Harris

It's a delicate, hair-raising business that usually ends in triumph, but can, in certain circumstances, end in tragedy. Welcome to the world of a bomb squad technician. It's explosive.

By William Harris

Do you know which features earn an ordinary firearm the "assault" label in the U.S.? There's more to that definition than just semi-automatic action.

By William Harris

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In 1961, the Soviet Union detonated the Tsar Bomba, still the biggest, most powerful nuclear bomb ever built. One of the cameramen who recorded the event said it sounded "as if the Earth has been killed."

By Patrick J. Kiger

From World War I to the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, the U.S. military has rarely been able to fire a shot without bringing along soldiers fluent in a language other than English. How does someone get a position translating for the army?

By Tristin Hopper

For as long as America has had soldiers, its army has been scrutinizing information about its enemies to gain an advantage on the battlefield. That's the job of an Army intelligence analyst. So, how do you develop a career in this exciting field?

By Jeff Harder

Picture yourself deep behind enemy lines, taking calculated risks to gather information about the enemy. This is Army reconnaissance work. How can you earn yourself a spot among the reconnaissance ranks?

By Thorin Klosowski

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Whether they're on the front lines treating soldiers' battle wounds or stateside caring for veterans, Army nurses are a trusted and respected part of the U.S. military. Think you have what it takes to be one of the military's medical elite?

By Caitlin Uttley

Whether you already know a second language or want to learn one, the Army's linguist program could provide you with ample opportunities. Find out how.

By Danielle Fisher

Doctors in the U.S. Army may tend the wounded in a combat zone but they're just as likely to be taking care of soldiers on an army base or doing research. Find out the benefits and challenges of becoming an army doctor.

By John Kelly

Want to join the service? One prerequisite for joining any branch of the U.S. military is a test called the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB). But what do the scores of this test mean, and how do they affect Army jobs?

By Denise Harrison

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Care of our public spaces and buildings, plus our environment, is a big job. Fortunately, we have the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, an organization trained and tasked with the challenge. So how can you work with this group?

By Denise Harrison

Air traffic control specialists (ATCS), known also as air traffic controllers, are the crossing guards of the friendly (and sometimes not-so-friendly) skies.

By Chris Opfer

You probably have no idea what explosives smell like. But dogs can be trained to detect that distinctive smell, even if it's just wafting through the air.

By Susan L. Nasr

Back in 1983 when the Cold War was in full swing, the U.S. was looking for an effective new tactic to deter a nuclear strike. The "Star Wars" missile defensive initiative, however, wasn't it. Why not?

By Jonathan Atteberry

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Students at the actual TOPGUN school aren't as cocky as the characters in the movies, but the fictional version gets a lot of other things right.

By Patrick J. Kiger

Members of the U.S. armed forces and their loyal dogs have always had a special relationship – so special that the canine usually outranks its handler. What's behind this military tradition?

By Nathan Chandler