Soldiers

Ever wondered what it's like to be a soldier? This section defines the people, technology and science used to equip soldiers. Articles here range from the technology of war and military snipers to gas masks and body armor.

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President Vladimir Putin ordered a partial mobilization in Russia during an address to the nation. What does that mean for citizens there and in Ukraine?

By Sarah Gleim

Ukraine is seeking foreign volunteers to join the fight against the Russians. But unless you've got military experience and elite skills, you probably should stay home.

By Patrick J. Kiger

Suicide is the fourth most common cause of death among veterans with PTSD. There are ways we can step in and help make sure these heroes don't become statistics.

By Shelley MacDermid Wadsworth

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Torture was formally abolished in Europe in the 19th century, but reared its ugly head again in the 20th century. Why did it reappear and what is its future?

By Diana Brown

Could a tiny creature called a tardigrade hold the key to slowing biological time, giving soldiers more opportunity to recover from life-threatening injuries?

By Patrick J. Kiger

Most experts agree that the all-volunteer military is what makes the U.S. armed forces the best in the world. Would that change if the draft was reinstated?

By John Perritano

In one of its more bizarre moments, the U.S. Army created voice tapes of allegedly wandering souls to depress Viet Cong morale.

By Alia Hoyt

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With military combat roles opening to all, should women have the responsibility to register for the draft at 18 like men? A bill aims to catalyze the conversation.

By Laurie L. Dove

Why the skies aren't exactly so friendly for drone pilots.

By Chris Opfer

Tattoos and the military seem to go together. Many U.S. soldiers get ink to commemorate their service or fallen comrades. And the tattooed Navy sailor is part of American folklore. But can a tattoo actually prevent you from serving your country?

By Debra Ronca

Formerly known as "shell shock," research into post-traumatic stress disorder began intensely after Congress requested a study of how Vietnam veterans were readjusting to civilian life in 1983. What have we learned since then about PTSD?

By Josh Clark

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The U.S. Navy SEALs exemplify unconventional warfare. Find out how conventional and unconventional warfare differ in this article.

By HowStuffWorks.com Contributors

Was a dog really the first to encounter bin Laden? We may never know, but we do know that man's best friend has been serving in wars for centuries, getting soldiers smokes, sniffing out bombs and patrolling borders. Why do canines make such good soldiers?

By William Harris

Wars and murders have much the same result -- by the end, someone will be dead. One is condoned, while the other is punished. Why is that? What makes the two so different from each another?

By Jonathan Strickland

People have been fighting with one another longer than humans have recorded their history. Conflicts are unavoidable. But can anyone say for sure when the first war broke out? Why did we invent wars, anyway?

By Jonathan Strickland

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The U.S. military spends a lot of time and money developing cutting-edge gadgetry to help keep soldiers and civilians alive in the heat of battle. How are these gizmos changing the art of war?

By Jonathan Strickland

Soldiers rely on all kinds of high-tech gadgets to help them get their jobs done. Some of them are specially designed for military use, while others are gizmos you might have in your pocket right now.

By Nathan Chandler

There are lots of video games about war, and manipulating game controllers can build hand-eye coordination. But does playing video games prepare you for real-life combat?

By Stephanie Crawford

The U.S. national terror alert level is yellow today. Does that mean you can ignore that suspicious ticking package resting by the bus stop or should you report it to the authorities?

By Robert Lamb

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Once you pass through this school's gates, you leave your civilian clothes and ordinary life behind and join the South Carolina Corps of Cadets. It's a far cry from the adventures of a typical, clueless college freshman. So what's knob life like?

By Craig Freudenrich, Ph.D.

These 10 technologies changed war and the course of history as we know it. Some of these battlefield innovations, like adding grooves to gun barrels, are surprisingly simple. So what else made our list?

By Susan L. Nasr

Have you always thought of yourself as more of a Jean-Pierre than a Jon? Good news, you can still be that guy, provided you're willing to fight for France for five years.

By William Harris

Professional soldiers have influenced history for centuries, fighting alongside colonists in the Revolutionary War and, more recently, providing private security in Iraq. What's life as a hired gun like?

By William Harris

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Bullet-resistant glass seems flimsy once you compare it with transparent aluminum armor. Will this new heavy-duty material soon be shielding soldiers and police officers?

By Tom Scheve

Game theory isn't about people scratching their heads over a never-ending game of Monopoly. Serious theorists, like Henry Kissinger, used it to form war strategies.

By Tom Scheve