Life Science

From the smallest microbe to the largest mammal, Life Science explores the origins, evolution and expansion of life in all its forms. Explore a wide range of topics from biology to genetics and evolution.

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The Bionic Reading app has exploded in popularity. But can it really make you a speed reader?

By Sharise Cunningham

Were hobbits and giants real? And are they distant relatives of humans?

By Diana Brown

An interesting defense mechanism recently observed in tomato plants has caterpillars turning on themselves rather than remaining vegetarian.

By Laurie L. Dove

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It happens to politicians, beauty queens and regular folks. Brain farts, that is. But, why?

By John Donovan

There are a lot of ways mental real estate can be allocated. Neanderthals evolved their big brains in a different way than we did — and you see where that got them.

By Jesslyn Shields

Depends on whether it needs to be quick or good.

By Michelle Adelman

Is it better to be grossed out by the smell of your asparagus pee, or not to be able to smell it all? A new study explains why some of us can detect this unique odor.

By Jesslyn Shields

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Yuo cna raed thsi rgiht? Probably, but that doesn't mean a popular internet meme on the topic is totally accurate.

By Laurie L. Dove

Scientists are discovering why some people break out into hives from physical contact like clapping hands or running.

By Karen Kirkpatrick

While 90 percent of murderers are men, female murderers differ from men in motive, method, circumstance and victim, according to a new Swedish study.

By Jesslyn Shields

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Folklore says heavy or spicy food before bedtime can cause nightmares. Surprisingly, there's been no real study of this — until now.

By Alia Hoyt

Politicians and celebrities often lie or exaggerate claims that can be easily verified, but why?

By Alia Hoyt

Research suggests the human brain is wired to distinguish the rhyme and rhythm of verse from ordinary prose, and to react to literary contemplation.

By Patrick J. Kiger

You'd think being able to smell drinkable water would be an evolutionary advantage. But we can only smell things that suggest potable water. Why is that?

By Jesslyn Shields

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Neanderthals may be long gone, but their genetic footprint lives on — in us.

By Robert Lamb

Maybe. A study that wasn't even about kissing turned out to (sort of) give the answer.

By Michelle Konstantinovsky

The flightless Aldabra rail lives exclusively on the Aldabra Atoll in Madagascar. But it appears to have descended from birds that soar.

By Mark Mancini

New research shows that homo sapiens weren't the first folks to decorate their caves with artwork. Neanderthals actually did it thousands of years earlier.

By Alia Hoyt

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The nitrogen cycle is the system by which nitrogen is converted into different chemical forms, some usable to humans and animals and some not, as it circulates among the atmosphere, the land and the oceans.

By Jesslyn Shields

Niels Bohr proposed the model of the atom that we still learn in school today, even though it's technically incorrect.

By Jesslyn Shields

This new form of sound therapy takes advantage of the fact that a different frequency in each ear yields a third frequency that can allegedly calm you down or improve your focus. Does it really work? Our writer tried it out.

By Alia Hoyt

We see faces in clouds, on buildings — heck, in grilled cheese sandwiches. But why is that? And how is this a help to our survival?

By Dave Roos

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Heat waves are becoming supercharged as the climate changes. How hot is too hot for normal daily activity, even for young, healthy adults?

By W. Larry Kenney, Daniel Vecellio, Rachel Cottle & S. Tony Wolf

You probably use the words mold and mildew interchangeably. But these two types of fungi aren't quite the same. Is one worse?

By Patty Rasmussen