Military

Explore the weapons and combat systems used by the armed services. A broad range of topics in the Military Channel includes tanks, aircraft, biological warfare and stealth technologies.

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Bump fire stocks enable a shooter like Las Vegas killer Steven Paddock to fire a semi-automatic rifle at nearly the rate of an automatic. How do they work?

By Patrick J. Kiger

New evidence shows that Big Tobacco specifically targeted U.S soldiers, because they were "less educated" among other reasons.

By Alia Hoyt

The Kim Jong Un regime continues to demonstrate its desire to threaten the U.S. and its allies with nuclear-armed ICBMs. But can any of these missiles actually reach the U.S. mainland?

By Julia Layton & Sarah Gleim

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Sheltering in place could give you the best chance of surviving a nuclear attack.

By John Perritano

Most experts agree that the all-volunteer military is what makes the U.S. armed forces the best in the world. Would that change if the draft was reinstated?

By John Perritano

A new study shows gun sales in the U.S. for self-defense soars, while sales for recreational shooting and hunting languish.

By Alia Hoyt

The history of the secret spy training school may be overlooked, but Camp X played a vital role in intelligence gathering during World War II.

By Ed Grabianowski

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The sci-fi weapon's destructive power may be closer to reality thanks to a recent test of the General Atomics Blitzer system.

By Patrick J. Kiger

In one of its more bizarre moments, the U.S. Army created voice tapes of allegedly wandering souls to depress Viet Cong morale.

By Alia Hoyt

The MOAB is the largest nonnuclear bomb ever used by the U.S. So what makes it OK to drop this bomb and not a nuclear warhead? We dive in to find out.

By John Donovan

With tens of millions of active landmines still buried around the globe, scientists are looking for efficient and safe methods to remove them.

By Laurie L. Dove

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The Air Force currently handles U.S. military activities in space. But some experts argue that the country needs a new, independent Space Corps.

By Patrick J. Kiger

Despite the phrase "going ballistic," the term "ballistic" refers to how a missile travels through the air, not its explosive capability.

By Patrick J. Kiger

Would populations boom and violence cease? Or would humans and human nature essentially remain the same?

By Christian Sager

For instance, gun silencers don't make guns all that quiet.

By Dave Roos

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How did it work? Is it still around? The BrainStuff team investigates.

By Allison Loudermilk

Aloft in the 1930s, the helium-filled USS Akron and Macon were aircraft carriers that docked biplanes. Today both rest beneath the waters off California's Pacific coast.

By Laurie L. Dove

With military combat roles opening to all, should women have the responsibility to register for the draft at 18 like men? A bill aims to catalyze the conversation.

By Laurie L. Dove

If you're traveling during the winter time, there's a good chance that your flight may be delayed because the plane needs deicing. Why do they wait until the last minute to do this?

By Karen Kirkpatrick

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Why the skies aren't exactly so friendly for drone pilots.

By Chris Opfer

Military types are looking to drones to fly the deadly skies.

By Chris Opfer

"Star Wars" at sea? That's sort of the promise of a new generation of laser-firing jets now being developed by the U.S. military.

By Dave Roos

We know how drone strikes are supposed to work: After careful monitoring, the bad guy is targeted and taken out. The reality is often much hazier — and deadlier.

By Clint Pumphrey

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Tattoos and the military seem to go together. Many U.S. soldiers get ink to commemorate their service or fallen comrades. And the tattooed Navy sailor is part of American folklore. But can a tattoo actually prevent you from serving your country?

By Debra Ronca

One U.S. Army leader says robots could account for a significant portion of American fighting forces in the next 20 years or so. Find out how machines are waging war now and how they may change the face of battle in the decades to come.

By Chris Opfer