Military

Explore the weapons and combat systems used by the armed services. A broad range of topics in the Military Channel includes tanks, aircraft, biological warfare and stealth technologies.

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Tattoos and the military seem to go together. Many U.S. soldiers get ink to commemorate their service or fallen comrades. And the tattooed Navy sailor is part of American folklore. But can a tattoo actually prevent you from serving your country?

By Debra Ronca

One U.S. Army leader says robots could account for a significant portion of American fighting forces in the next 20 years or so. Find out how machines are waging war now and how they may change the face of battle in the decades to come.

By Chris Opfer

From constructing bridges to blowing them up, combat engineers must have a head for spatial thinking and a heart that isn't faint. Ready to learn about these military enlistees who are as much action as they are equation?

By Kate Kershner

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Sarin has no taste, no color and no odor. It's a human-made nerve agent, and only a tiny amount can cause serious harm. Where did this dangerous substance come from, how does it work, and how can investigators test for it?

By Nathan Chandler

Formerly known as "shell shock," research into post-traumatic stress disorder began intensely after Congress requested a study of how Vietnam veterans were readjusting to civilian life in 1983. What have we learned since then about PTSD?

By Josh Clark

Would you believe there are videos showing toddlers opening gun safes? Turns out some of them are not very secure. Why is that, and what should you look for when buying one?

By Julia Layton

Since the 9/11 terrorist attacks, an estimated 54 other attacks on the U.S. have failed. And these are only the ones we know about. Some, like the underwear bomber and the shoe bomber, live on in infamy. Others are more obscure.

By Laurie L. Dove

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It's a delicate, hair-raising business that usually ends in triumph, but can, in certain circumstances, end in tragedy. Welcome to the world of a bomb squad technician. It's explosive.

By William Harris

In 2013, North Korea said it had readied missiles for potential strikes on U.S. military bases. The U.S. government said it was ready to intercept them. But what does that really mean?

By Patrick J. Kiger

The massive explosion at a fertilizer operation in the town of West, Texas, raised the question: With the tremendous amount of fertilizer the world blows through, are accidents like this a frequent occurrence?

By Kate Kershner

Firearms get the historical spotlight, but what about the projectiles they hurl at insane speeds? Here are the innovations that gave rise to modern ammunition. Think of it as 10 rounds of ammo info.

By William Harris

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High-profile shootings often make people wonder if the victim or victims would still be alive if no guns had been available. But is that true? Are people more reckless simply because they have a gun?

By Becky Striepe

Do you know which features earn an ordinary firearm the "assault" label in the U.S.? There's more to that definition than just semi-automatic action.

By William Harris

The term "semi-automatic weapon" is used in the U.S. media often. But what does it really mean? Is it just another term for a machine gun?

By Chris Opfer

We're not talking about one of those laughable get-ups that celebs don when they want to go incognito for a latte. Nope, we're talking elaborate disguises -- from operatic to scientific.

By William Harris

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"Die Hard" films' John McClane (not to mention a long line of other Hollywood action heroes) never met an explosion he couldn't outrun. In real life, it's not so easy to sprint away from a blast.

By Chris Opfer

It may make you run. It may make you throw up. It will definitely make you cry. It's tear gas, and it's no fun to be hit with.

By Robert Lamb

As Benjamin Franklin once quipped: "There never was a good war or a bad peace." That's why these five countries have gotten out of the military business entirely.

By Jonathan Atteberry

War often leads to great innovation as opponents strive to outsmart one another, and the war on terror has catalyzed countless technological innovations.

By Stephanie Crawford

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You probably have no idea what explosives smell like. But dogs can be trained to detect that distinctive smell, even if it's just wafting through the air.

By Susan L. Nasr

Technology has changed the way we fight wars. Future conflicts may be resolved with completely different types of weapons than the ones we use today. What can we expect to see in the years to come?

By Jonathan Strickland

The U.S. Navy SEALs exemplify unconventional warfare. Find out how conventional and unconventional warfare differ in this article.

By HowStuffWorks.com Contributors

Was a dog really the first to encounter bin Laden? We may never know, but we do know that man's best friend has been serving in wars for centuries, getting soldiers smokes, sniffing out bombs and patrolling borders. Why do canines make such good soldiers?

By William Harris

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Back in 1983 when the Cold War was in full swing, the U.S. was looking for an effective new tactic to deter a nuclear strike. The "Star Wars" missile defensive initiative, however, wasn't it. Why not?

By Jonathan Atteberry

After the airplane was invented, it just took a few decades for the world's despots to realize air power could be used to terrorize civilian populations. Do no-fly zones succeed at protecting the innocent?

By Patrick J. Kiger